AD #2111 – Volvo Creates Autonomous Garbage Truck, EU Accuses Italy of Diesel Deception, Ford Explains Job Cuts

May 17th, 2017 at 11:51am

Runtime: 6:36

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- Ford Explains Job Cuts
- EU Accuses Italy of Diesel Deception
- Volvo Ready to Give Up on Diesels
- Amazing Progress in Automotive Safety
- 1st Car to Ever Get a Speeding Ticket
- Volvo Develops Autonomous Garbage Truck

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16 Comments to “AD #2111 – Volvo Creates Autonomous Garbage Truck, EU Accuses Italy of Diesel Deception, Ford Explains Job Cuts”

  1. G.A.Branigan Says:

    Now,feel free to correct me if I’m wrong,but isn’t the reason for so many diesel cars in the eu due to diesel fuel’s much cheaper price?

    If that’s the case,why don’t they just license our clean diesel tech,and do what we did? I don’t know the price difference between diesel and gas in the eu,but it must have been pretty substantial.

  2. David Sprowl Says:

    @1) a cursory look leads me to believe that diesel and no lead prices are very close in per liter price. My only guess is that the MPG efficiency is what gives diesel the nod for most buyers.

    While I like diesels, I can not get past the maintenance cost to keep them running.

  3. Don B. Says:

    If the car companies get away from diesels, will we loose out on development of bio-diesels. We will loose a renewable energy source.

  4. G.A.Branigan Says:

    Most,if not all of our pickup truck diesels are factory certified to run B20. That’s a good start.

    Maint costs: Sure a diesel holds more oil,but that isn’t a big deal.Filters: as I posted yesterday,most can be bought from cat,branded as cat,and meet or exceed factory specs,and costs much less.

    Def: That’s no big deal either as far as costs go.

    The biggest thing would be the emissions equipment to repair/replace.But with routine maint and care,those should last a long time too.

  5. Kit Gerhart Says:

    1. 2 At one time, European countries actively encouraged diesel use, with lower tax on diesel fuel. As David said, the pump price of regular gas and diesel are now similar, or they were the last time I was over there about 8 years ago.

    Now, the appeal of diesels is the 20-30% better fuel economy,but the stuff needed to clean up diesels makes it hardly worth it, for passenger cars.

  6. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Unless tbe supply of biodiesel increases a lot, there should be enough demand from trucks and boats to use the available supply.

    From my experience, hybrids are the best alternative to diesels for cars, if you want fuel economy. I had a 1.9 tdi Jetta wagon for a couple years, and averaged about 41 mpg overall for mixed driving. My 2010 Prius averaged about 47 mpg for similar driving, on fuel with less energy per gallon. I suspect the Jetta would get better city mpg, and only slightly worse highway mpg with the Prius powertrain, and would accelerate better with the Prius powertrain, than with the 1.9 tdi.

  7. Chuck Grenci Says:

    As it were, I am at Disney presently; just saw that their bus fleet runs R50 (50%) fuel, which claims a renewable diesel made from non-consumable food waste. This seems slightly germane to the argument that diesel can be clean and renewable. After all, it seems that a multi-faceted approach to our energy problems is the current correct approach. The EU claim against Italy seems retrospect and witch hunting at best; they need to move forward to correcting past indiscretions, and if not criminal, put forth effort for a better tomorrow (and leave sleeping dogs lie). JMO

  8. Kit Gerhart Says:

    #7, Chuck, is the “non-consumable food waste” fryer oil, or something else? Maybe they didn’t say.

  9. Chuck Grenci Says:

    #8 Kit
    They didn’t say; I saw it in one of there advertisements. I did assume fryer oil though. I was impressed with the 50% part though.

  10. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I knew a restaurant owner who used 100% fryer oil in an ’80′s Benz diesel in Florida. He mechanically filtered it, and nothing else. The only problem was that it would coagulate if it got too cold, low 40′s if I remember correctly.

    I suspect today’s diesels are much pickier about fuel than that ’80′s car.

  11. G.A.Branigan Says:

    @ Kit: You can buy the equipment to make your own bio-diesel,if one wanted to spend the money on it.There is a lot more to using fryer oil then just filtering.And,today’s clean diesels are only certified to run a max of B20.

    And yes,they are picky.Even the injectors are ultra precise and don’t pass much garbage into the cyl before clogging up.I do know that if you read the owners manual of the new diesels,they recommend more frequent oil and filter changes.Not sure why though.

  12. G.A.Branigan Says:

    I meant to say if you run B20,oil and filter changes are more frequent,per the manuals…

  13. G.A.Branigan Says:

    Here’s a good article on the use of biodiesel.The article is dated,but it explains it pretty good.

    http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1044927_why-cant-flex-fuel-clean-diesels-run-entirely-on-biodiesel

  14. Bobby T Says:

    I assume that the 2mph speed limit in Germany only applied to motor vehicles. I don’t know about you, but I’d probably fall off my bike at that low a speed.

  15. Kit Gerhart Says:

    13 Thanks for the link. It sounds like the people I knew who used straight fryer oil in the 80′s Mercedes were very lucky, but I was only around them, and the car, for about a year. I don’t know what happened after that. They added regular diesel fuel to the tank when it got colder than normal so the fuel wouldn’t solidify, a problem mentioned in the article.

  16. Ukendoit Says:

    RE: Early automotive laws, I’ve heard of lots of crazy old laws concerning early automobiles. The link on my name has a few. I heard some places had a law that said the automobilist could not operate his contraption without a fake horse head on the front.

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