AD #2129 – Boeing to Test Pilotless Plane, Top Selling Brands in the U.S. Market, Hyundai Reveals All-New Small CUV

June 13th, 2017 at 11:52am

Runtime: 7:12

To watch this episode on YouTube click here.

- Apple Confirms Autonomous Plans
- Boeing Going to Test Autonomous Plane
- Top Selling Brands in the U.S. Market
- Hyundai Reveals All-New Small Crossover
- The IIHS Tests Mid-Size SUV Headlights
- Fisker Tweets the EMotion

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22 Comments to “AD #2129 – Boeing to Test Pilotless Plane, Top Selling Brands in the U.S. Market, Hyundai Reveals All-New Small CUV”

  1. G.A.Branigan Says:

    Today’s episode loaded just fine ;}>

    Autonomous passenger planes? A hackers dream come true?

  2. Barry Rector Says:

    Shawn,
    All those headlights that have been deemed “unacceptable” for lack of lighting sure seem to be VERY BRIGHT when they’re behind me at night!

  3. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Work on autonomous flight began in the 1970′s, (or maybe earlier). A college friend worked on this project in 1980-81, and I got an interesting tour of the airplane. They had made completely autonomous landings by 1980 or so. Autonomous flight is much easier than autonomous driving on public roads.

    https://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/factsheets/B-737.htmlhttps://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/factsheets/B-737.html

  4. Sean McElroy Says:

    @Barry – That’s one of the reasons why the headlights are being rated so poorly. Too much glare for other drivers.

  5. Kit Gerhart Says:

    They need to go back to glass sealed beam headlights. The design can be tightly specified to reduce glare, and the glass doesn’t turn opaque after being exposed to the sun for a few years.

  6. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Work on autonomous flight began in the 1970′s, (or maybe earlier). A college friend worked on this project in 1980-81, and I got an interesting tour of the airplane. They had made completely autonomous landings by 1980 or so. Autonomous flight is much easier than autonomous driving on public roads.

    https://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/factsheets/B-737.htmlhttps://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/factsheets/B-737.html

  7. Kit Gerhart Says:

    They need to go back to glass sealed beam headlights. The design can be tightly specified to reduce glare, and the glass doesn’t become opaque after a few years in the sun.

  8. GM Veteran Says:

    Here is a link to an article that provides additional information on the Fisker EMotion, for those of you that are interested. Its been priced at $129,900 and ordering starts June 30th. http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1110914_all-electric-fisker-emotion-orders-open-june-30-starting-at-129900

  9. JWH Says:

    #5 – Believe we would all be disappointed with lighting on the road if we went back to the ancient sealed beam headlights. Back in the 60′s & 70′s I would use European H4 composite headlamps for improved lighting. I also preferred the sharp cut off of the European pattern although many optics designers I’ve worked with over the years did not like the European code sharp cut off. Much better in fog, snow, & other inclement weather. One other point is that headlamps are required to meet photometric output criteria per FMVSS 108. Headlamps are aimed leaving the factory – What the owners do later is not within the control of the headlamp manufacturers.

  10. Sean McElroy Says:

    @Kit – I for one vote that sealed glass headlights stay in the past. Today’s headlights have much better illumination and can be designed to reduce glare as well, but according to the IIHS “automakers just don’t have any guidance on how headlights should illuminate the road.” And in a number of cases headlight performance could be improved just by adjusting aim. This is where I think the IIHS has uncovered a bit of an industry problem. How can automakers be putting out headlights that aren’t aimed properly?

    I will add, I do think the IIHS headlight test can be a little misleading. It awards extra points for things like auto high beams and adaptive (turning) headlights. Things many people don’t care about or want to spend the extra money on. There are a number of vehicle headlights that performed very well in tests but did not earn a high(er) rating because they didn’t have those technologies. Headlights are already expensive. Let’s hope automakers don’t throw more expensive technology at them so they can earn a “good” rating.

  11. Kit Gerhart Says:

    #9 I wasn’t too serious about going back to sealed beams, but some of the later halogen ones weren’t too bad.

    I had H4′s in my ’74 Duster, and they were great. I, too, liked the sharp cutoff. They had glass lenses, which were either like new, or broken. Like with current lights, the reflectors could tarnish over time.

  12. Kit Gerhart Says:

    10 Interesting. It sounds like my 2017 Prius may have a better IIHS headlight rating than it deserves, because it has auto high beam.

    I think my Corvette has a “mid” rating, but to me, the headlights are very good. The high beams seem better than on other cars I’ve had. I don’t have much chance to even use high beams, though.

  13. Drew Says:

    @10 – Sean, amen to your 2nd paragraph.

  14. Chuck Grenci Says:

    The best headlights I’ve ever experienced were on my ’06 and ’11 Cadillac STS. They were HID and very white. They had Intellibeam, and it worked very well, but it was constantly switching back and forth in normal driving so mostly I didn’t use it, however when there were few other cars on the road it was terrific. My current XT5 has the halogen headlights, and while not as good as my previous vehicle(s) seems quite adequate. I would have liked to have gotten the LED’s (on my XT5) but the vehicle I purchased didn’t come with them (and it is not retro-fitable).

    And as earlier said, if you don’t know what the IIHS wants (in a beam), it’s going to be hit or miss on whether they (automakers) hit the target.

  15. Ziggy Says:

    @11 Kit, I had a ’74 Duster also, did yours have the three speed manual floor shift and the slant six engine?

    To answer your question from yesterday, the Army trucks were medium and heavy duty cargo vehicles that had push button transmission selectors mounted to the center console just to the right of the driver with “buttons” similar to old microwave oven buttons, I always thought they should be adapted for cars since they were so simple to use and I guess now in some forms they are.

  16. G.A.Branigan Says:

    I had a 70 Duster 340. Great car,handling was like a typical 60′s/70′s performance car. Sold it when I got married and had my first kid on the way. Bought a 68 Torino GT,289,(Early 68 models still had the 289).

    Nice size for a family mover.Needed a truck too for work,and bought my first brand new truck. A 1974 Dodge B100 1/2 ton van.225 slant six,three on the tree. What a long strange trip it’s been since then,lol.

  17. Kit Gerhart Says:

    @15 Ziggy, my Duster did, in fact, have the 3-speed manual on the floor, and 225 slant six. It was medium green with white bucket seats.

  18. Kit Gerhart Says:

    16 The good Duster 340 was before I had the money to buy cars like that. I got my six cyl. Duster during the 1st “gas crisis,” when prices went up a lot, and there were gas lines where I was. A friend had a ’69 Barracuda 340 fastback, which was a cool car.

    Thinking about those 70′s cars really shows how far we’ve come. My six cylinder manual Duster got 23-24 mpg at 60 moh, and I thought that was good. My Corvette gets 29-30 mpg at 80 mph. A V8 Camaro or Mustang wouldn’t do much worse than the Corvette.

  19. BobD Says:

    15 – The Army trucks in question likely used the Allison Transmission with a push button shift tower. The early ones with a four speed automatic had R N D 3 2 1 buttons arranged in a 2 x 3 matrix. More recent six/seven-speed transmissions had a R N D and up and down arrows to manually select lower hold ranges with an LCD display.

  20. Len Simpson Says:

    On overseas or other distance flights , the pilot only does takeoffs & landings, the rest of the trip is on auto pilot

  21. Roger T Says:

    Am I alone to think the compact crossover from Hyundai seems irrelevant and its styling quite boring? Looks like it could have been a Citroen, and not one of their better designs. I can’t get used to this split headlight idea, same thing with the Jeep Cherokee

  22. Terry Says:

    Did the vehicle sales include trucks. It seems not long ago, this column reported GM sold more vehicles when trucks were included.

    Please clarify.

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