AD #3099 – Tesla Reveals Model S Plaid; VW ID.4 Test Drive Impressions; Jeep Grand Cherokee L Rolls Down the Line

June 11th, 2021 at 11:53am

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Listen to “AD #3099 – Tesla Reveals Model S Plaid; VW ID.4 Test Drive Impressions; Jeep Grand Cherokee L Rolls Down the Line” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 11:13

0:07 Beyond Ludicrous and Onto Plaid
1:15 Ford Updates the Raptor
1:59 Ford Makes Electric Motor In-House
3:26 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Rolls Down the Line
4:53 Gentherm Cuts EV Cabin Heating 70%
6:55 VW ID.4 Test Drive Impressions
9:25 Lamborghini Makes Life Size Lego Car

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21 Comments to “AD #3099 – Tesla Reveals Model S Plaid; VW ID.4 Test Drive Impressions; Jeep Grand Cherokee L Rolls Down the Line”

  1. Kit Gerhart Says:

    It seems that torque numbers for electric motors get thrown around rather loosely. Probably the motor for the Maverick hybrid has 1696 pound-feet of torque, the same way the engine in a Toyota Corolla has ~2400 pound-feet of torque. Take the 120 lb-ft of the engine, times ~5x reduction in first gear, times ~4x final drive ratio, and you get 2400.

  2. Marshy Says:

    I’m a big lego fan but am not that interested in these full size models. However, Sian Technic kit is a fantastic model of anyone is mildly interested. Working sequential gearbox and suspension along with nicely done working scissor doors.

  3. Tim Says:

    #1 – I agree. Technically, electric motors have unlimited torque, until they melt. It’s really a meaningless number until you know how it’s limited.

  4. Tim Says:

    #1 – I agree. Technically, electric motors have unlimited torque, until they melt. It’s really a meaningless number until you know how it’s limited.

  5. ChuckGrenci Says:

    #1 Well said; ICE engines generally use torque figures at the crankshaft, and while BEV’s are similar, at the shaft, multiples can be achieved through gearing (measured at the axle), the way that was reported with the BEV Hummer (10,000 ft/lbs).

    p.s., for Kit: gleaned from Rick Corvette Conti’s vlog; an order guide will be available 6/28, orders will start to be taken for 2022′s July 1st, the starting price will be raised $1200 ($62,195 starting for the coupe) and Build Your Own will be offered 9/6.

  6. Kit Gerhart Says:

    5 Thanks for info. I should probably visit my sales guy on the 28th. Do you know if the queue carries over, or will it be starting from scratch for people with 2021 orders that aren’t built?

  7. wmb Says:

    I wonder how Tesla got more leg and head room out of the Model S, when it has a carry over platform? I guess the redesigned the seats?

    The new Grand Cherokee L looks like it will be a hit and I’m sure they’ll sell everyone they make!

    John i agree with you, the ID4 looks like a very capable vehicle that will appeal to a wide audience and not just BEV faithful. Which is good for the brand and the general audience. I just wonder when or if they, like some other OEM’s have done when the exited the sedan market and went full tilt toward SUV/CUV/Crossovers,VW may decide to only offer EV’s in a certain class or size of vehicle. They being so confident that what they offer as a EV is just as competitive as the ICE competition.

  8. Kit Gerhart Says:

    7 It looks like Tesla just lowered the seats of the Model S.

    The ID.3 is the electric VW that would appeal more to me, but not surprisingly, they won’t sell it in the US.

  9. Merv Peters Says:

    thanks for another great week

  10. ChuckGrenci Says:

    #6 Pretty sure all starts from the beginning. You won’t have price protection either. Rick, on the vlog mentioned that allocation may change in the way it is distributed but I don’t think much is set in stone.

  11. Kit Gerhart Says:

    #10 I’m ok with the moderate 2% price increase, but I was hoping I’d keep my place in the queue. It’s not that I need another sports car, though. I think my salesman will keep me informed, and I appreciate your updates.

  12. Sean Wagner Says:

    Regarding the Model S Plaid, it is pretty intriguing how the separate twin rear motors are kept so perfectly in (or out of) synch that no differential is required. The Taycan has one rear motor with an integrated two-speed transmission plus compact differential. The cars’ respective max rear motor rpms are 20K and 16K.

    That yoke just looks so cheap, though. They could have wrapped it in black Alcantara. Nerds do get access to loads of data and controls for the suspension (and much else, I presume).

  13. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I just got this email from a friend with a Model S (non-plaid):

    From the Tesla owner’s manual:

    “In addition, Traffic-Aware Cruise Control may react to vehicles or objects
    that either do not exist or are not in the lane of travel, causing Model S
    to slow down unnecessarily or inappropriately.”

    “Indeed it does. It will slam on the brakes for no good reason. I find this
    interesting, but (blank) doesn’t like it.”

    It sounds like we need to make sure to not follow Models S too closely.

  14. Stryder Says:

    75 second cycle time to build an electric motor? I think i need some more explanation of that before i can believe it. Can you provide more detail? Maybe a video of the 75 seconds?

  15. Stryder Says:

    75 second cycle time to build an electric motor? I think i need some more explanation of that before i can believe it. Can you provide more detail? Maybe a video of the 75 seconds?

  16. Sean Wagner Says:

    14 Well hello again Stryder – When you look at the components and their integration, it shouldn’t come as a surprise. These are not big, wound motors like Audi manufactures in Hungary (methinks).

    It’s actually quite significant and I applaud Ford for taking this particular piece of engineering-cum-highly-automated production back in house.

    A little metro runaround could operate solely on an electric motor smaller than that. Throw in 2’000 USD worth of battery cells. Plus one third the service costs according to the head honcho of Hyundai America.

    13 Kit – Tesla’s “cruise control” needs refinement after the latest update, from what I’ve heard. However, its “autopilot” still reacts quickly and the stats show that Teslas are tops both in active and passive safety. The system has defused quite a few hairy situations.

    On that tack, Cadillac including Supercruise on the upcoming Lyriq is a great decision. At a base of 60K, the car can’t come soon enough and in sufficient quantities to world markets.

  17. Sean Wagner Says:

    Oh yes, one more thing: Munro’s look under the Mach-E’s frunk reveals a welter of hoses and components that compare unfavorably to Tesla’s Octovalve. Worth looking into, and Ford hopefully is working hard on an update to those innards.

    Never mind the manufacturing complexity with lots of manual labor to boot – entirely predictable warranty costs alone should spur them on – I can easily point out one particular place that will give them headaches and entail costly repairs.

  18. Kit Gerhart Says:

    16 My friend has just standard equipment on the Model S, no optional autonomy stuff. He and his wife will soon be taking their first long trip in the car, from the Seattle, Washington area to Muncie, Indiana. It will be interesting to hear their thoughts about the 15 stops for charging, ranging from 15 to 55 minutes, replacing the 4-6 gas stops with the Prius V it replaced. The Tesla trip planner shows what looks like exactly the same route as google maps shows for a gas car, but 43 hours 14 minutes for the Tesla, and 33 hours for the gas car.

  19. Sean Wagner Says:

    18 abetterroutplanner.com 13 stops, longest 37mins, 40h 16min total. 2020 Model S.

  20. Kit Gerhart Says:

    19 Interesting. abetterrouteplanner uses some of the same, but many different chargers from the Tesla planner on what looks like the same route.
    I wonder what Elon thinks about abetterrouteplanner.

  21. Sean Wagner Says:

    20 abetterrouteplanner.com indeed. I think Elon is good with anything that furthers Tesla’s mission. Please let us know how that trip turned out! Compared to European distances, it’s epic. Oslo to Syracuse is about in the same league. It’s not so long ago that Italian Superchargers were too thin on the ground, just like SC’s in the US interior.