AD #3108 – Used Car Prices About to Go Down; All-New Infiniti QX60 Debuts; Ford Offers Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance

June 24th, 2021 at 11:38am

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Listen to “AD #3108 – Used Car Prices About to Go Down; All-New Infiniti QX60 Debuts; Ford Offers Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 10:35

0:07 Used Car Prices About to Go Down
0:46 Used Car Prices Up $5,000 in 1 Year
1:15 U.S. to Impose Tire Tariffs
2:38 All-New Infiniti QX60
4:12 Honda Civic Hatchback Debuts
5:12 Ford Offers Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance
5:56 Performance Mach-E’s Beat Range Estimates
7:26 U.S. Years Away from Rare Earth Self Sufficiency

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9 Comments to “AD #3108 – Used Car Prices About to Go Down; All-New Infiniti QX60 Debuts; Ford Offers Pay-As-You-Drive Insurance”

  1. Wim van Acker Says:

    Enjoy your time off, Autoline Team

  2. Lambo2015 Says:

    My guess as to why Ford under-rated the Mach-E performance. This is their first step into the BEV market and what would be a bigger black eye than to have over rated the performance? Not to mention the lawsuit that would follow for misleading consumers. No one will complain about getting more range but short them and it leaves a bad taste the company cant shake. Something you certainly don’t want to do on your BEV introduction.

  3. Lambo2015 Says:

    John; Just curious why Bloomberg would assume used car prices will come down in weeks when the (cause for the increase) micro-chip shortage has not been resolved. We are running limited production this week due to GM cutting production so I don’t expect the new car production to be fixed in the next couple weeks.

  4. wmb Says:

    The QX60 certainly is a head turner, inside and out!

    #2). I think that is a good call on why the range of the Mach-E is better than expected. To add to that, I wonder if the range was down graded to accommodate people horse’n around with the Mach-E too?! If driving it around as an ordinary SUV/CUV gets you the “new” range for the GT, that would be good enough. But if chasing your tail antics, only results in the previously quoted range, even better! That would mean that there is not a big hit to range, if one were to stretch the GT’s legs from time to time. It would mean that one could use it for family duties through the week and chase sunsets on the weekend, with no major hit to range! The best of both worlds from an crossover that believe its Mustang.

  5. Ed Says:

    I traded a few weeks ago my 2017 Tacoma, 60k miles, for a new vehicle, the dealer now has my trade in on the lot for 43,995. ; when I bought it there in fall 16 I paid them 38,100.
    It has not sold but amazing it may sell for 5800 more than new, with mileage. And the lot is practically empty. And I had to pay 1800 over sticker for the new one, was a “inventory adjustment” . Why did I do the deal? I also got the “adjustment” on my trade in. Was a wash, and I have the new.

  6. Kit Gerhart Says:

    5 That sounds pretty good. “Adjustments” in your favor are hard to come by with tradeins.

  7. Norm T Says:

    Ed, what was the trade-in price?

    My Dad bought a 2021 Blazer RS as extra car and got 10% off MSRP.

  8. Kit Gerhart Says:

    3 Maybe used cars are the new toilet paper, and people have been hoarding them, running the price up. Maybe the hoarder market is now saturated, so prices will be going down.

  9. MERKUR DRIVER Says:

    3) A lot of people are just holding until prices fall. There has been enough reporting out there for everyone to understand if you buy a car right now you are paying top dollar. If you don’t need a car immediately, then you will just wait until the price contracts. Same as what happened with Lumber. So it is basically a contraction in demand; not an increase in supply driving it.