AD #3377 – Most EVs Won’t Qualify for Federal Credit; Counterfeit Parts on the Rise; Lucid Cuts Production Forecast in Half

August 4th, 2022 at 11:53am

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Listen to “AD #3377 – Most EVs Won't Qualify for Federal Credit; Counterfeit Parts on the Rise; Lucid Cuts Production Forecast in Half” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 10:21

0:07 Ford Sales Worth the Wait
0:42 Toyota’s Profits Fall
1:24 Most EVs Won’t Qualify for Federal Credit
3:21 BMW Could Help Other OEMs Modernize Plants
4:36 Counterfeit Parts on the Rise
5:29 Porsche Aims to Speed Up Vehicle Development
7:13 CATL Not Likely to Open Plant in the U.S.
8:02 Mid-Size Cars Struggle on Updated Impact Test
9:00 Lucid Cuts Production Forecast in Half

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18 Comments to “AD #3377 – Most EVs Won’t Qualify for Federal Credit; Counterfeit Parts on the Rise; Lucid Cuts Production Forecast in Half”

  1. Buzzerd Says:

    Not surprising that the majority of cars didn’t do well in that test as a change of almost 1000 lbs and the speed is a pretty large increase in force. Also some of those chassis are a little long in tooth.

  2. wmb Says:

    Regarding the crash test with the increased speed, I wonder how this will impact test conducted with EVs? With there greater weight and lower center of gravity, I would think that they would could potentially do more damage to a non-EV vehicle. I remember the increase in insurance rates they came as a result of more people choosing CUVs and SUVs. The insurance Institute suggested that their potential for exposure, was greater when a vehicle was involved in a collision with an SUV, and therefore they charge higher rates for those who are driving those vehicles. As more by BEVs come on the market are we looking to pay more as a result of the extra white those vehicles carry as a result of their batteries?

  3. Albemarle Says:

    Ford seems to be getting their act together these days. They are taking some control back from dealers, particularly with respect to pricing. We’ll have to see if they can win long term. In the meantime they are actually producing EVs in greater volumes. Makes it harder yet for the self-described world leader in EVs (GM) to catch up.

  4. Lambo2015 Says:

    Sean when you say “Counterfeit parts” are components out there being sold as OEM parts? Cause everyone knows you can get cheap parts at Autozone but in no way are they OEM approved. I’m all for taking down false advertised parts that claim to be OEM if they are not but is someone is offering an aftermarket part for MB that’s cheaper then you know what your getting and may be willing to accept the lesser performance.

  5. Kit Gerhart Says:

    1 The current Camry and Accord have been around since 2018 model year, and Malibu since 2016. I don’t know about the others. That is a very severe test, though.

  6. Kit Gerhart Says:

    If these numbers are correct, Mach-E sales vary wildly, month-to-month. It must be parts supply issues. I suspect demand is such that they could sell twice as many, if they could build them.

    https://www.goodcarbadcar.net/ford-mustang-mach-e-sales-figures/

  7. Sean McElroy Says:

    @Lambo – These are counterfeit parts being sold as though they are genuine MB parts.

  8. Kevin A Says:

    years ago, I owned a Suzuki Swift. I had a fender bender with and sent it off to be repaired. When it came back, it was now a Geo Metro, since those parts were noticeably cheaper. My Suzuki dealer no longer wished to honour the warranty after the change. I was ticked because I preferred the Suzuki styling and the car’s trade in value had gone down. Too late to do anything about it though.

  9. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I guess no AAH today. Maybe it was announced, and I forgot.

  10. merv Says:

    That crash test vehicle has really nice mag wheels

  11. Wayne Says:

    My previous employer, FAG Bearings (now part of the Schaeffler Group) has had issues for years with counterfeit bearings world wide. Some of the manufacturing facilities were discovered and shut down but not all and new ones soon replaced them. The inferior bearings were being produced in very crude facilities in various locations (many in China) and even had realistic fake packaging. The seriousness of this issue was not small as many of the fakes were used in applications where safety was a concern and put people in danger with their use.

  12. Kit Gerhart Says:

    11 Do these totally counterfeit substandard bearings end up in NAPA stores, etc. and sold as legit name brand parts?

  13. Bob White Says:

    With a market share of 32.6% in 2021, CATL is the biggest lithium-ion battery manufacturer for EVs in the world, producing 96.7 GWh of the global 296.8 GWh, up 167.5% year on year.

  14. Bob White Says:

    With a market share of 32.6% in 2021, CATL is the biggest lithium-ion battery manufacturer for EVs in the world, producing 96.7 GWh of the global 296.8 GWh, up 167.5% year on year.

  15. Bob White Says:

    #12

    Yes they appear everywhere as do all counterfeit products. WalMart even had and issue with counterfeit toothbrushes…

  16. Kit Gerhart Says:

    8 I’m surprised they didn’t want to honor the warranty, except for the Chevy cosmetic parts. The VIN would show that it was originally sold as a Suzuki. I guess I’m surprised it even needed warranty work. A friend drove a Metro, the good version, 1.0 manual, over 200K miles with no problems.

  17. Lambo2015 Says:

    I remember working a border town in Mexico back in the 90s and went into a jewelry store in a very modern mall. They had knock off Rolex watches for $20. They looked identical other than the second hand ticked where the Rolex does not. I was surprised because I thought that was only something you would find from a street vendor.

  18. Kit Gerhart Says:

    17 I have a Rolex from 1983 that no one would make a fake of. It has a smooth bezel, unlike the fluted bezel of most Rolexes.

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