AD #3460 – Elon Drops Details On 1 MW Charging; Nobody in China Wants This EV; November Sales Weaker Than Expected

December 2nd, 2022 at 11:54am

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Listen to “AD #3460 – Elon Drops Details On 1,000 MW Charging; Nobody in China Wants This EV; November Sales Weaker Than Expected” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 9:47

0:08 U.S. November Sales Weaker Than Expected
0:43 EU OEMs Might Get IRA EV Subsidies
1:35 Elon Drops Details On 1 MW Charging
2:55 BEV Sales Higher Than Expected in ASEAN
3:38 VW Updates the ID.3
4:29 BMW Starts Low-Volume FCEV Production
5:00 BMW Patents Suspension for EV Regen
6:07 Nobody in China Wants This EV
6:56 The Advantages of Off-Roading with An EV
8:23 Opel Shows Off Wild Design Contest Vehicle

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20 Comments to “AD #3460 – Elon Drops Details On 1 MW Charging; Nobody in China Wants This EV; November Sales Weaker Than Expected”

  1. Lambo2015 Says:

    I can understand why the people in China would avoid Evergrande. However, people have short memories. No doubt government bailouts of GM and Chrysler turned some people off to them, and the Diesel gate with VW, which has leached into other diesel manufacturers maybe caused people to look elsewhere. So whats the lifespan of these mis-steps? Can Evergrande recover? If they finished up the apartment buildings and made things right would it be enough? Or is the damage done? All good questions that we may never know the answers to, but sounds like this had a huge impact to Evergrande.

  2. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Those 1 MW chargers will need some seriously big, and well insulated wire. From what I find, 1500 kcmil, or 1.225 inch diameter copper wire is needed for the 1000 amp current you’d have for 1 MW at 1000 volts. Aluminum wire would need to be ~1.4 inch diameter.

  3. Kit Gerhart Says:

    The bailouts didn’t affect me at all, when GM or Chrysler had products I liked. If either company had people paying for uncompleted cars, or apartments they couldn’t use, that would keep me away for a long time, or forever.

  4. D Ford Says:

    The gradeability of an EV is downright incredible. The only concern I’d have is when things go wrong and that low center of gravity starts whipping around during a barrel roll downhill.

  5. Kit Gerhart Says:

    4 You’d want a really strong roof/roll cage.

  6. Lambo2015 Says:

    2 So I wonder if there be any risk to folks with pacemakers walking around these high-power lines needed to charge these trucks? Seems there may be some unforeseen risks to handling 1000 amp cords. I would have some hesitation in a rainy or snowy day where everything is wet and I’m standing in a puddle plugging in a vehicle with a 1000 amp cord. Does that sound like a bad idea to anyone else?

  7. merv Says:

    thanks for another great week of autoline

  8. Kit Gerhart Says:

    6 They wouldn’t be powered up until after they are plugged in, but I wouldn’t want to be touching anything anywhere near the connector, after it’s powered up, if standing in a puddle. Being DC, I wouldn’t think it would affect pacemakers, but I could be wrong.

  9. Kit Gerhart Says:

    A friend has been waiting about 2 months for a repair part for front end crash repair of a Ford Transit. Is this normal? Have they shut down production of Transits because of lack of parts, or do they just divert all of the parts to production, and say “screw the customer” who has already bought the van?

  10. joe Says:

    The higher the voltage at EV charging stations, the more dangerous it gets. It’ll be a tricky thing to accomplish using that kind of voltage with coolant and making it safe at the same time. It’s possile such an idea will never materialize anytime soon.

  11. Kit Gerhart Says:

    10 The good thing is that DC is not as much of an electrocution hazard as AC, but 1000 volts sounds dangerous, even DC.

  12. ChuckGrenci Says:

    11, While correct that DC is not as dangerous, they both can shock (and kill). It looks like the magnitude between A/C and D/C is in the two to three ‘degrees’ of difference, meaning it can take two to three times more D/C to inflict the same response as A/C. With the amounts that are being used in charging, both can be fatal. Link: https://www.allumiax.com/blog/ac-vs-dc-which-is-more-dangerous

  13. Kit Gerhart Says:

    12 Interesting article. I’d always heard that the same current of DC through your body was less harmful than AC, but hadn’t seen actual data like that. When in the UK in the navy, I heard that 50 Hz AC was less hazardous than the same amount of current at 60 Hz, but that may not be true. People may have said that to try convince us that their 230 volt wall outlet voltage is no more dangerous than the 120 volts in the U.S.

  14. Kit Gerhart Says:

    12 Thanks. Good, informative article.

  15. Kit Gerhart Says:

    12,13 Brits have told me that 60 Hz is worse than 50 Hz, so the hazard of their 230v 50 Hz is about the same as for 120v 60 Hz in the US. I’m not sure I believe that.

  16. ChuckGrenci Says:

    14, The one article I found about 50 or 60 Hz and electrocution agreed with your evaluation; not any difference that makes a difference. In fact as far as performance, 60 Hz is more efficient but perhaps at their higher voltage they may take the ‘crown’ as to power.(but we have 240v so there’s that too)

  17. Kit Gerhart Says:

    15 Using higher voltage in Europe for regular house wiring would have the advantage of getting by with smaller wire. I think the UK and the rest of Europe use ~230v for everything, rather and using “double” voltage for dryers, water heaters, ranges, etc. If that is not the case, someone please let us know.

  18. MERKUR DRIVER Says:

    9) This is unfortunately normal right now. The supply chain disruptions that they have spoken about for production are worse for post production. I have seen it take 3 months or more for spare parts of even popular vehicles.

  19. Lambo2015 Says:

    18 My brother just waited about that long for a warranty fix. Yeah everything seems to be on back-order.

  20. Tony Gray Says:

    Gotta love analysts. When they are right, it’s news. When they are wrong, it’s bigger news.