AD #2203 – VW’s Dealers Revolt Against SUV Name, GM Sees All-Electric Future, EV Prices Likely To Go Up a Lot

October 3rd, 2017 at 11:55am

Runtime: 7:08

To watch this episode on YouTube click here.

- GM Sees All-Electric Future
- Tesla Misses Production Targets by a Mile
- EV Prices Likely To Go Up a Lot
- Why Honda Dropped Accord V6 and Coupe
- CAR Names Carla Bailo CEO
- Solid Global Car Sales
- VW’s U.S. Dealers Revolt Against SUV Name

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31 Comments to “AD #2203 – VW’s Dealers Revolt Against SUV Name, GM Sees All-Electric Future, EV Prices Likely To Go Up a Lot”

  1. Chuck Grenci Says:

    I think that there were a lot of naysayers right here at the Autoline Daily forum that suspected Tesla would lag on their production goals. I believe the management of Autoline also looked at Tesla with a jaded eye (John, correct me if I’m wrong). Anyway, even with Tesla’s explanation of why it didn’t reach its goals I don’t think that answer holds much water when there is such a disparity in what it originally stated and what was produced.

  2. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I don’t know what Teramont means, but it sounds like a better tham than Atlas for a VW CUV. Atlas would be a better fit for some sort of off-road monster truck.

  3. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Why will EV’s get more expensive, even as batteries get cheaper? Is the world already running out of the minerals used in the magnets for the motors?

  4. MJBTV Says:

    I don’t know where you get the Tesla news from but you are reporting on things that are not true.

  5. Bradley Says:

    As a small town midwestern American…I like Teramont better than Atlas.

    The issue with Toureg and Tiguan is the names were never explained. (until recently)

  6. Lisk Says:

    I’ve had my doubts about Tesla from the very start. While I am impressed with the ability to build a car from scratch, I could never understand how any company, especially a small startup, can continue to operate with red ink quarter after quarter. The fact they burned through $10 billion even surprised me. I sensed it was a lot, but had no idea it was that much.

    Not building 1,500 Model 3s as predicted was no surprise. So far no journalists have been able to test one yet (other than riding impressions) leads me to believe the cars have issues.

    But never mind the details, they’ll still be able to raise capital to keep them afloat for another couple of years.

  7. phred Says:

    How can Fiat loose so much $$ per car when they have such a “Cheap Engineering Design” manual for their production models. Just look at the JD Power Survey for Quality.

  8. Lambo2015 Says:

    GM; With new vehicle programs running the 36 to 48 month range. Means these 20 EVs will need to be on the drawing board by July 2019. We’ll see.
    EV pricing; If the government really wants to push the EV’s without the cost of offering up subsidies. All they need to do is drive up gasoline taxes. Take in money rather than spending it to push this agenda.. I hope they don’t but just saying..

    Tesla; I interviewed there in 2015 as they were preparing to go high volume with the model 3. Something they were and apparently are not familiar with doing. Its new to them and comes with challenges they haven’t dealt with before. That would be my guess to their production struggles.

  9. MJB Says:

    I’ll take “Atlas” over Teramont.

    #5 – A lack of explanation of the previous car names by VW, I believe, was only a very small part of the problem.

    Not everyone cares enough about cars to even care what’s in a name – as long as it ‘sounds’ nice. Even if VW had put out ads telling what the names meant, consumers would likely forget as soon as the next TV commercial aired.

  10. John McElroy Says:

    #4. Not sure what you mean that what we’re reporting about Tesla is not true. Our source is Tesla itself: http://ir.tesla.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=1042449

  11. Lambo2015 Says:

    #9 I like the names that already had meaning and were not made up with two exceptions. I like names like Mustang, Challenger, Impala, Javelin, Magnum, Viper, Cobra, Prowler and even Pinto. The exceptions Camaro and Corvette which just never sounded made up.

    But I hear the definition of Camaro is a fierce animal that eats Mustangs. Could be a rumor.

  12. John McElroy Says:

    #3. There’s a lot of “rule of thumb” in this answer but here goes:
    Munro & Associate estimates GM loses $7,400 on Bolt EV, which has a 60 kWh battery pack. GM pays $145 for each cell. That’s $8,700 just for the cells. I’d estimate the total battery pack is $220 per kWh, or $13,200. None of this includes the cost of the power electronics.
    Let’s say the cost of cells drops to $80, and that drops the cost of the pack by $4,800. GM still loses $2,600 on every Bolt. No doubt GM will come up with other efficiencies to close that gap or even erase it. But it will need to raise prices if it really wants to make a profit.

  13. Chuck Grenci Says:

    Camaro while made-up is a derivative of the French camarade meaning friend (or something similar); editorial license I suppose. As to the Corvette, that is a quick naval vessel from which the name was borrowed (and to a greater degree redefined what really is the meaning of Corvette).

  14. Len Simpson Says:

    It makes no sense at all to me , putting a 1/2 ton of batts with a limited lifespan in an over priced ,limited versatile , semi luxo barge. Nissan is eventually going to rule the day w/it’s few batts, small eng/gen semi constant duty design,not yet available here. KISS RULES!
    When I started leaning the trade there were no ——oil filters , auto transmissions or 12 volt systems. Spark plugs barely lasted 10K,brake shoes about the same, dimmer switches & some starter buttons were on the floor, as was the shift lever. Average vehicle life span was 60-75k w/engine o’hauls or at least valve jobs needed at 30-35k.neglect & metallurgy were prime culprits

  15. Len Simpson Says:

    Speaking of pollution—EVs don’t pollute , per say, but what about the plants that charge those batts ?

  16. Kit Gerhart Says:

    #12 Thanks for the explanation. I didn’t know that GM was losing that kind of money on the Bolt. Yeah, unless they can lower manufacturing cost a lot, the price of EV’s will need to increase, if/when a lot of EV’s are sold, replacing sales of high profit pickups, big SUV’s, etc.

  17. RickW Says:

    Len, I seem to have been cut from the same cloth as you. Or more precisely born at a more simpler time. I remember frequent valve jobs and annual brakes jobs, etc.

    It makes no sense at all to me , putting a 1/2 ton of batts with a limited lifespan in an over priced ,limited versatile , semi luxo barge. Nissan is eventually going to rule the day w/it’s few batts, small eng/gen semi constant duty design,not yet available here. KISS RULES!
    When I started leaning the trade there were no ——oil filters , auto transmissions or 12 volt systems. Spark plugs barely lasted 10K,brake shoes about the same, dimmer switches & some starter buttons were on the floor, as was the shift lever. Average vehicle life span was 60-75k w/engine o’hauls or at least valve jobs needed at 30-35k.neglect & metallurgy were prime culprits

  18. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Automatic transmissions have been around for my entire lifetime; Hydromatic began in about 1940 and I was born in 1946, but I certainly remember the 10K mile spark plugs, and also 1-2 year mufflers, both wrought on us by leaded gas. Had I known in the 1960′s what I know now, I would have paid the extra for the unleaded Amoco gas that would have made my plugs and mufflers last about 5 times as long.

    I suspect part of the short engine life in older cars, in addition to metallurgy, was that some of them were seriously undergeared. The 1950 Plymouth I drove while in high school had a flat head six with 4 3/8 inch stroke, and had a 3.55 rear end ratio. That engine was spinning way too fast for its own good, when driving 70 mph on the highway.

  19. Albemarle Says:

    GM could start this wonderful EV explosion by actually shipping the Bolt to where the current orders are. Overstocked in California and not stocked at all in other areas. I thought this was Bolt specific but it turns out GM is pretty bad at this. A friend traded his Cruise (for a premium) into our dealer because another dealer across the border just can’t get enough of them. I thought there were computer programs that handled this. Must be some supervisors know better…

  20. Bradley Says:

    I thought the company that tore the Bolt apart, said GM is making money on it.

  21. Lambo2015 Says:

    Kit your mufflers are lasting longer due to the fact that all emissions equipment needs to last 100K miles and for that reason most is made of a high grade 300 series stainless while the rest of the system (behind the catalyst) is typically 409SS. Unleaded fuel had very little if anything to the increase in muffler life.

  22. Kit Gerhart Says:

    21 I didn’t have cars I kept very long in the right time frame to prove anything on the mufflers, but the OEM mufflers on my BMW motorcyle went from lasting about a year, to lasting 8 years, after the switch to unleaded.

  23. JWH Says:

    #13 (& others) – Many years ago when starting at Chevy Engineering in 1966 we were told Camaro = “Pal”. Take it for what it’s worth.

    #18 & others – I remember a friend of mine from Oldsmobile (if you can remember them) that as engineers we could never spend the amount of money to increase engine life as no lead fuel did. While we bemoaned the decrease in compression ration necessary at the time, electronics has done wonderful things for engine performance & economy in the years since. In addition, aware that in later years after we adjusted engine design to meet no lead fuel parameters, extra money had to be spent to meet middle eastern countries where leaded fuel was used. In essence, no lead fuel increased engine life & increased spark plug life tremendously. I can still remember having to replace plugs in 57 Chevy (12.5 to 1 CR) every 1,000 miles if I wanted it to reach 7200 RPM without complaining too much.

  24. Al573 Says:

    #23 did you ever try Lodge spark plugs, precursor to E3

  25. Kit Gerhart Says:

    Wasn’t Lodge part of Lucas, Prince of Darkness, or maybe it was Smith’s?

  26. Al573 Says:

    They were standard on my 69 ALFA Spyder claimed to fire in oil, very unique shape of ground points and central electrode.

    Worked in my BMW Tii engines as well

  27. Barry Rector Says:

    John,
    Does the amount that Chevrolet looses on each Bolt take in account the amount GM charges each dealer who wants to sell it? I’ve heard that it’s somewhere around $50K plus tools and training of techs.

  28. XA351GT Says:

    Well GM it’s been good knowing you . I want to know how the hell they come up with this crap? You can’t sell Bolts and Volts. You already cancelled the Cadillac version and the Opel version before dumping the whole brand. So how the hell do you ever expect to survive selling these boat anchors? It seems completely insane to take this track . Which by all appearances looks like a one way trip to oblivion.

  29. Lambo2015 Says:

    #22 I don’t have an answer to explain your change in motorcycle exhaust longevity as I know they don’t follow the same emission requirements as passenger cars. But I would guess it was a switch in material. Leaded fuel was phased out in 1974 which mainly happen due to the use of catalytic converters which couldn’t handle the lead. Leaded fuel was still available for Off-Road vehicles until 1996 when it was finally banned fully. Not sure where your BMW falls in there but I’d really be surprised to find any evidence that unleaded fuel had any effect on exhaust rusting.

  30. Kit Gerhart Says:

    #29 I got the bike in 1977. You could still get,(in central Indiana) and I used leaded premium into the early ’80′s, and went through two or three sets of expensive OEM mufflers. After I started using unleaded gas, the mufflers lasted the rest of the time I had the bike, which was another 7 or 8 years. I can’t prove anything, but there was no indication that BMW had changed the material used for their replacement mufflers.

    As far as cars, my ’57 Chrysler, ’66 Dodge Coronet, and ’74 Plymouth Duster went through mufflers quickly, but from ’78 Dodge Omni to the present, I have never replaced another muffler. Maybe Chrysler, and everyone else changed to stainless steel exhaust systems after 1974, and that made mufflers last nearly forever. If so, they should have made that change much earlier.

  31. Len Simpson Says:

    Kit , I got my first car the year you were born