AD #2303 – Mahindra Reveals New SUV, Porsche Interested in Passenger Drones, Steer-By-Wire from Nexteer

March 5th, 2018 at 11:38am

Runtime: 6:51

0:29 Trump Threatens Import Tax on European Cars
1:00 Gender Wage Gap at Uber
2:06 Mazda Says Rotary Engine Is Returning
2:52 Mahindra Reveals Jeep Inspired SUV
3:41 Mercedes Shares Electric Bus Details
4:42 Steer-By-Wire from Nexteer
5:45 Porsche Interested in Passenger Drones

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23 Comments to “AD #2303 – Mahindra Reveals New SUV, Porsche Interested in Passenger Drones, Steer-By-Wire from Nexteer”

  1. XA351GT Says:

    I can’t see how Chrysler isn’t going to throw a stink about that Mahindra Jeep copy.

  2. XA351GT Says:

    Wouldn’t whomever bought Willy’s back in the day be the holder of the rights? Which I’m guessing went to AMC ,before Chrysler absorbed them making them the rights owner? Also I watched a video where the commentator said it could be made street legal with certain modifications.

  3. Lex Says:

    It is a big mistake for Mahindra to bring the Jeep copy cat to North America.

    My understanding was that the Mazda Rotary Engine too dirty and that was why it was dropped. What has changed?

  4. Frederick Schmidt Says:

    Autonomous vehicles, when the auto- makers can build a car/truck with brake rotors that don’t warp or eliminate electrical and technolgy defects and other common recall issues, I for one will drive my own car. Its a nice pipe dream but the lawyers will love the roads full of self driving vehicles.

  5. phred Says:

    I hope the copy Jeep can be towed behind a RV on the street. The Mazada rotary EV hybrid sounds like the perfect application for the single rotor engine – I want one!

  6. Lisk Says:

    Someone actually came up with a study for Uber that concluded if you are a man work more hours and work in better areas than a female you’ll make more money? Didn’t see that coming.

    I’m not sure Mahindra can build the Jeep copy and market it as “off road use only? Law enforcement won’t give this another look as it drives down the street. I’ll bet in India, this is quite the fine road vehicle. Maybe all the regulations we have here in the U.S.A. are a good idea after all.

  7. gary susie Says:

    YEARS AGO I SAW SEVERAL MAZDA’S WITH ROTARY ENGINES AND THEY LEAKED OIL EVERYWHERE!

  8. Kit Gerhart Says:

    How does Mahindra build a 2.5 liter turbo diesel that makes only 62 hp? It must have negative boost from the turbocharger.

    Mazda has come up with a good application for a rotary engine, an “occasional use” range extender for an EV. While inefficient, dirty, and an oil burner, the rotary is small and light for its power output. A rotary would probably be a good choice for the i3 REx, if they wanted more power to avoid the occasional “slow down” that I’ve read about, when driving too fast, or in hilly terrain.

  9. BobD Says:

    While some people might like the nostalgia look of the “jeep”, for the same money, you can get a much more functional “side-by-side” ATV like the Polaris RZR series. I don’t see much of a market other than perhaps an outfitter running a “jeep” trail experience who is looking for a knock-off rather than buying real Jeeps.

  10. Jim Haines Says:

    The Uber money story plays to how stupid society has become.seondlt if they have money to blow on that topic to begin with how much money is wasted on stupid paper pushing bullshit

  11. Kit Gerhart Says:

    9 Anyone running a “jeep” trail experience would have a limited market in the U.S. with the Mahindra thing, because it has a manual transmission.

    I’m thinking Mahindra should stick with tractors in the U.S. market. People haven’t forgotten about those pickup trucks yet. Maybe those who have signed up to be jeeplet dealers have forgotten, though.

  12. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I have used Uber twice, and both drivers were men. One of them had to have been driving Uber strictly for fun. He was driving a late model Ram 2500 diesel. He’d barely be taking in enough to pay for the operating expensives, never mind the depreciation and “lost use” of $50K or more.

  13. Lisk Says:

    If you look at some of the popular ATV, that are more capable for about the same money, It’s obvious they are purely off road vehicles. I think the Mahindra Jeeps will be treated like a golf cart and used for that occasional jaunt to get a 12-pack.

    So when are they talking about starting production? I would think a PowerSports dealer agreement would be much easier to acquire than a truck franchise, and the regulations on selling them would be more relaxed. I can see 14-year olds buying them.

  14. Sean McElroy Says:

    @Lex – The Mazda rotary range extender sounds like it will only be used to charge the battery(s). So, it likely will never be used under much load and should run at constant speeds.

  15. G.A.Branigan Says:

    Caveat Emptor when it comes to buying into a franchise from mahindra.

  16. Kit Gerhart Says:

    FCA should be suing Mahindra by now.

    I suspect way too many of those Mahindra “jeeps” will end up being driven on public roads. There are already too many illegal, uninsured ATV’s on suburban and country roads in Indiana. It’s obvious that they don’t belong there, and they are often ridden by kids who are too young to drive. There are apparently few enough fatalities for the police to care about enforcing the law.

  17. Chris Del Rossi Says:

    I knew that someone at some point would try to develop a steer by wire system. The real question is what will their solution be to handle failures in the system. How do we pull off to the side of the highway at 70 mph when the steering wheel isn’t connected to the wheels on the road? What happens when the failure occurs mid-turn on a rural back road lined with trees?
    The actual mechanical linkage found in cars today and for decades prior is simple and robust for this very reason. Sure, the power systems added to it have gotten quite complicated, but if they fail, you don’t lose the connection, just the assist (which is why I don’t understand the lawsuits against GM for the ignition switch fiasco). But this system apparently has no such redundancy in it. In fact it doesn’t sound like it has any redundancy other than taking over if the human fails.

  18. omegatalon Says:

    Trump should withdraw the United States from NATO; then countries within the European Union will be forced into spending more money in defense or be at risk of Russia invading them as Germany’s Angela Merkel can brush up on her Russian.

  19. aliisdad Says:

    #4… You post says exactly what I have been thinking.. Well said!!

  20. Ctech Says:

    If Porsche can get their drone to fold up into a briefcase when it lands then I am sold!
    I believe there was a U.S. firm which built gas powered generators for the military using rotary engines.

  21. Kit Gerhart Says:

    These “passenger drones” will be for those who can spend $1000 for a 2 mile taxi ride. Porsche should know better than to spend their money on that. Also, Geely should have known better than to buy Terrafugia. Aerocar didn’t do so well in the 1950′s, and Terrafugia is unlikely to do well now. You can make a flying car, but what you have is a bad car, and a bad airplane.

  22. Lambo2015 Says:

    Uber wage gap? Where is all this controversy they speak of? Because actually until hearing of their ridiculous waste of time study on the radio I had not idea and heard nothing.
    Sounds like another study to point out inequality when its pretty obvious that making 7% more for working more hours and in better paying areas just makes common sense.

  23. Lambo2015 Says:

    Well might as well bring on autonomy if cars are going to be steer by wire matched with the few available manual transmissions and gas and brake pedals that are by wire. The whole driving experience will be like playing a video game. I personally enjoy the spirited driving of a nice sports car and pushing the limits of the vehicle. Cant help but believe those days are numbered and driving will be just a mundane task to get from point A to B. Any excitement will require a day at the track. I enjoy driving and often times turn all the ABS, TC and stability options off to really feel the road and what the car can do. Guess I will need to keep an old school muscle car just for fun.