ATW #2503 – The Hydrogen Economy Takes Another Step Closer

January 27th, 2021 at 10:30am

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Audio-only version: Listen to “Autoline This Week #2503 – The Hydrogen Economy Takes Another Step Closer” on Spreaker.

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Internet Premiere: Wednesday, 01/27 @ 10:30am ET
Detroit Public TV: Sunday, 02/07 @ 10:30am ET

PANEL:
Bryan Pivovar, NREL
Frank Markus, MotorTrend
Bob Gritzinger, Wards Intelligence
John McElroy, Autoline.tv

Hydrogen fuel cell cars are not going mainstream anytime soon. But they make a lot of sense in other parts of the transportation sector, such as with semi-trucks, trains and ships. Wall Street is also waking up to the possibilities and investors are sniffing out investment opportunities. Bryan Pivovar, a Senior Research Fellow at the National Renewable Energy Lab, talks about the progress being made in hydrogen production and fuel cell development.

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2 Comments to “ATW #2503 – The Hydrogen Economy Takes Another Step Closer”

  1. George Ricci Says:

    I still have not heard anything about a major breakthrough in the efficiency of making hydrogen. It takes 250kWh of renewable energy to make enough hydrogen to go 330 mile in a hydrogen car or you can recharge an electric car multiple times and go over 1000 miles.

    Now if you say that we need zero emissions regardless of cost for Semi trucks, buses, trains, earth moving equipment, etc, then hydrogen maybe the best way to go. Lets use California as an example of the future, we have the highest gas taxes, some of the highest dmv fees, some of the highest income taxes, electric rates are double of what the rest of the country pays and the grid is unreliable, housing costs are extremely high, major companies are leaving, and a growing homelessness problem.

  2. rich simonetti Says:

    Interesting show. A lot of food for thought.