AD #3342 – VW To Recycle Batteries Multiple Times; AAA: Don’t Waste Money on Premium; Celestiq Is Handbuilt Flagship

June 9th, 2022 at 11:59am

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Listen to “AD #3342 – VW To Recycle Batteries Multiple Times; AAA: Don’t Waste Money on Premium; Celestiq Is Handbuilt Flagship” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 10:26

0:08 Biden Wants EV Chargers Every 50 Miles
0:58 Siemens Invests in Wireless EV Charging
1:37 AAA Says Don’t Waste Money on Premium Gas
2:25 Chinese OEMs Capturing More EV Sales
3:30 Cadillac Celestiq Is Handbuilt Flagship
4:39 Genesis to Make One-Off Luxury Cars
5:00 VW Expands AWD Option on ID.4
5:49 VW To Recycle EV Batteries Multiple Times
7:09 Volvo Pushes Dealers Aside with Phone App
7:57 Nexteer Uses AI To Detect Changing Road Surfaces
9:07 Emergency Flashers Enter the Modern Age

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26 Comments to “AD #3342 – VW To Recycle Batteries Multiple Times; AAA: Don’t Waste Money on Premium; Celestiq Is Handbuilt Flagship”

  1. Scott from Asheville Says:

    Please just hand the $5 billion for chargers to Tesla with the caveat that they make their charging system open to all. Put it in the states hands? Classic big government tactic to convert taxpayer money into garbage. Who want to take bets on how much of that $5 billion actually makes it into chargers that work?

  2. Scott from Asheville Says:

    Please just hand the $5 billion for chargers to Tesla with the caveat that they make their charging system open to all. Put it in the states hands? Classic big government tactic to convert taxpayer money into garbage. Who want to take bets on how much of that $5 billion actually makes it into chargers that work?

  3. Scott from Asheville Says:

    Please just hand the $5 billion for chargers to Tesla with the caveat that they make their charging system open to all. Put it in the states hands? Classic big government tactic to convert taxpayer money into garbage. Who want to take bets on how much of that $5 billion actually makes it into chargers that work?

  4. Drew Says:

    Perhaps to Scott’s point, installation of chargers is just a start. Maintenance of chargers and avoidance of waiting lines are key elements, too.

    Relative to faster emergency flashers, I hope someone is doing their diligence to assure the faster flashers don’t trigger epileptic seizures.

  5. George Ricci Says:

    Photosensitive epilepsy is when seizures are triggered by flashing lights or contrasting light and dark patterns. Generally, flashing lights most likely to trigger seizures are between the frequency of 5 to 30 flashes per second (Hertz). Emergency Safety Solutions may have a great product, but if it triggers seizures in some people, it will go nowhere.

  6. Lambo2015 Says:

    “President Biden wants half of all new car sales to be electric by 2030.” Yea! I can tell every time I get gas. Maybe he should worry more about fixing the things he can before 2024.

    Cadillac flagship and Genesis one off are niceties for the uber wealthy but most will never see one in person. The Cadillac Celestiq may be a way for Cadillac to present itself more upscale but its going to have to be an exclusive build that doesn’t share even a vent with another GM product.

    As for dealers going direct with EV sales. Is anyone surprised by this? Its been mentioned on this site many times before that dealerships are a outdated business model. First one in the states was like 1898 so almost 125 years old and much like an elevator operator, pay phone or cab driver things evolve and dealerships are no needed in their current capacity. I believe we still need certified service centers and a place to test drive do a touch and feel of a vehicle. But sales and financing can all be done online and help the consumer avoid extra costs from financing kickbacks and extra warranty tactics. The days are numbered for dealerships new car sales and I for one don’t feel sorry for them especially as so many have taken limited production vehicles and marked them up a crazy amount.

  7. Albemarle Says:

    I can understand auto makers wanting to go direct. Our business was wholesale distribution of complex items. As we used to say; selling was like trying to push on a rope. It was so hard to get our dealers aligned with the needs of the ultimate customer.

  8. Albemarle Says:

    Seems to be a glitch on the web site. Are comments awaiting moderation?

  9. Lambo2015 Says:

    7 I mean with the “build it tool” that most manufacturers offer its pretty easy to build exactly what you want play around with the options and even view the vehicle with interior and exterior changes to what you want. This provides the customer with basically the ability to view every and any possibility that can be ordered that a dealer isn’t always going to carry. Plus if they start to offer feedback manufacturers will start to hear what the consumer actually wants rather than what the dealers want to put on their lots. Its really a win for everyone but the dealership.

    8 Not for Scott

  10. Kit Gerhart Says:

    If the government is going to spend money for chargers, it should be to make home charging available to the tens of millions of people in condos and apartments. An EV would be perfect for about 2/3 of the people in my condo building, except that there is no place to charge an EV. Many of these people are retirees who rarely, or never take long trips. One of the more popular cars is a Kia Soul.

    For reasons unknown to me, the electric utility won’t install individual service in the garages, even if a customer would pay for it, and the “community” power in the garages is only for lights and door openers. The wiring would not be sufficient for car charging, so “sub metering” is not really an option. At some point, there will be charging “everywhere,” but I probably won’t be around to see it.

  11. GM Veteran Says:

    Cadillac says they can build 1.2 Celestiqs per day. So, a max of 438 per year if they never shut down the “plant”. Maybe they will finally build something close to the many beautiful concept cars they have shown but never come close to building.

  12. GM Veteran Says:

    You can see some of the recent Cadillac concept vehicles at this link: http://www.cadillac.com/concept-vehicles

    My bet is the Celestiq will be very close to the Escala.

  13. Kit Gerhart Says:

    6 Biden doesn’t have much to do with the price of gas. Oil is a global commodity, and with the greatly increasing demand as Covid lockups end, the price of oil goes up. Of course, the EU embargo on Russian oil has also contributed to higher crude prices.

  14. GM Veteran Says:

    #10 This sounds like an issue to bring up with the condo association board. Sounds like they would need to run more power to the parking area and then the utility would work with them to connect chargers. How the billing would work for individual residents is something the board would have to work out. I don’t see why the government would pay to install charging equipment in an apartment building or condo development any more than they would at my house.

  15. XA351GT Says:

    5 Billion on chargers what a joke. that money will be spent and not one damn charger will be installed. just like all those shovel ready “green” jobs promised by Joe Blow’s former boss. Billions of dollars wasted and nothing to show for it for the tax payers. Every 50 miles ? He can’t be that clueless. How many people live in a 50 mile area ? If half of them have EVs wanting to charge how many does he think that’ll take . Charging isn’t like gassing up. It takes many minutes to get a full charge not 5-10 minute gas stop.

  16. Roger T Says:

    I liked the Celestiq concept much more vs the one that looks like the Lyriq. Understand why it does, but not as nice

  17. Kit Gerhart Says:

    14 It has been brought up with the board, and there are no good options. They found that one of the commercial charging networks might consider installing a charger or two at our complex, if it could be available to the general public. That is clearly not a good option for us. Anyway, as more interest in EVs emerges, more options will come up. As far as the condo association spending tens of thousands of dollars on additional service and chargers, the assessment to pay for it probably wouldn’t go over well with a majority of the owners. That could change, in time.

    A big difference between apartment complexes and your garage, is that you probably already have power in your garage, and none is available anywhere at most apartment complexes, except in the living areas. Anyway, there are no simple answers.

  18. Lambo2015 Says:

    13 That’s hilarious Kit as just 4 years ago it was Chuck Shummer berating Trump for the spike in gas prices when it got over $3. That releasing oil from the federal reserve and all these things that could help the American consumer. I guess the Pres can only affect gas prices when it a pres you don’t like. Policies to shut down drilling and pipelines have affects just like a hurricane does. There are things that can be done that will affect prices. But yes its still a global market that while many elsewhere in the world was paying $5 a gallon 4 years ago we were paying $1.80

  19. Lambo2015 Says:

    17 I would bet, the majority of homes that have an attached garages only have 120V outlets. So even if there is power, its not sufficient. Most people will need to run a heavy gage wire assuming their fuse panel can support it and provide a specific outlet to charge an EV. Personally at this point I would consider mounting the charger just outside the garage and charge in the driveway as not to risk burning down my house in case of a battery fire. I wonder if EV ownership and personal charging has changed home ownership policies yet? Unless we assume the Bolt will be the only battery problem and they’ll all be great now.

  20. Kit Gerhart Says:

    18 Yes, there’s plenty of hypocrisy to go around among Politicians.

    New drilling wouldn’t have an effect for years, and no pipelines in the U.S. have been shut down. Even the oil companies aren’t very anxious to do much new drilling, knowing the demand for oil will decrease as global EV market share will steadily increase from the current 9-10%.

    Gas is much more expensive in much of the world than the U.S. because the tax is much higher. The tax in the UK is $4.16 U.S. per U.S. gallon. Some countries have higher tax than that.

  21. Kit Gerhart Says:

    19 A 120V outlet would work for commuting for a lot of people. You’d get 40+ miles of driving, just by plugging it in when you get home from work. Also, many or most houses with attached garages have the main breaker box in the garage, where it would be cheap and easy to install an extra 240V outlet, if you have the capacity to install and extra set of 30-40 amp breakers.

    I’ve wondered if home insurance would be higher if you park and charge an EV in your garage. I haven’t heard that it is higher. There may not be enough data yet to know the statistical risk.

  22. merv Says:

    we have the odd gas station that offers premium plus as a fourth option.

  23. wmb Says:

    With Lucid and others charging big dollars for their BEVs, I get why Cadillac/GM is build a high mark sedan. And it would be better to build lesser, but still pretty expensive, luxury models with this halo vehicle. Yet, I don’t know, it still feels a little dirty that Cadillac’s second EV will be a vehicle that is out of touch and beyond the reach of the many of the blue collar folk that has supported them in both lean and better times! I understand that they will eventually get back to they loyal fans, for if this flagship model doesn’t move the needle, guess who they’ll fall back on?! Add to that, Cadillac’s most popular vehicle, the Escalade, has already gotten pretty pricey. But, this hand built halo sedan, if Sean’s guesstimation is correct, could be one of the most expensive Cadillac’s in a loooong time!

  24. Kit Gerhart Says:

    The AAA/Detroit News article says only 1% of gas sold is mid-grade. That doesn’t sound right. Some cars, like certain applications of the Chrysler 5.7 “hemi” specify mid-grade, and I’ve used it a few times in “premium recommended” cars, though I normally use regular in those.

    Here is an interesting article Car and Driver did a few years ago, testing some very different vehicles with different grades of gas. Interestingly, the one that benefitted the most from using 93 octane was an F-150 with the 3.5 turbo, which, I think, specifies 87 octane gas. They may say to use premium for “best performance,” though.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a28565486/honda-cr-v-vs-bmw-m5-ford-f-150-dodge-charger/

  25. Sean Wagner Says:

    The Celestiq also is a halo car for China, where the price tag and exclusivity can be an asset – provided the product holds its own.

    European luxury marques have until recently been providing rich returns from there.

  26. Norm T Says:

    My 2018 CT6 2.0E plug-in can see about 45 miles of range by charging at 120v/12-amps for 12 hours. With more wall outlets on buildings, the base of lighting fixtures, and garden area access, there would be enough to cover most people’s commutes. Then they could plug-in again at work, shopping/dining, or where ever they park. You just might have to carry your own portable charger and loop it through a wheel spoke so no one steals it.