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6-1-2018


Hi John,
 
Here's another reason why NASCAR is essentially on life support.. with less viewers as Comcast packaging of channels makes it more difficult for viewers to watch races; it's not like yesteryear where NASCAR races were always on non-cable channels.. every change Comcast makes is costing sponsors $Millions and some just won't pay and why 7-time champion Jimmie Johnson is looking for sponsors.
 
Mike
6-1-2018


John,

Tesla is now bringing out an EV with major technology upgrades every 2 years. If GM makes little change to a platform for 15 years, its EVs will be well out of date. The 8 year cycle with a refresh at 4 years must be under pressure for a reduction.  

Love Hightower's analysis of the Africa based on your interview. Despite the geopolitical issues, western carmakers should attack the market. The irony is, the more successful the automakers are with production in Africa, the more money customers will have to buy the vehicles, but the industrialisation will reduce the birthrate and the market - something the world needs. Africa is on a path to be 50% of the worlds population in 50 years if it does not develop - displacing people from the rest of the world.

Regards
Peter
Peter,

GM is talking about the underlying structure of the car not changing. Not the technology that gets bolted onto it, such as batteries, motors, computers, etc. The body styling will also get updated regularly.

Tesla already used the kind of layout GM is talking about, which ironically GM pioneered with its HyWire prototype.

John McElroy
6-1-2018


Exclusive Info from Tesla CEO Elon Musk on CR's Model 3 Braking Results ...

John,
So..A more simple powertrain/body/chassis architecture, many things software upgradeable..and upgradeable quickly with OTA updates, and a laser focused CEO that is flattening the org to speed decision making and fix problems rapidly.
 
Think you’ll probably continue to talk about Tesla regularly? 
 
PS. What’s the projected multi year cost to American Consumers of the proposed switch to premium only fuel?  
And how much EV charging infrastructure would this pay for?
 
 
And..I hope Ford is working on an eRaptor PHEV and not some lame, doomed to be a sales flop overpriced f150 PHEV with 15 miles electric range.   It should be a performance AWD PHEV with better efficiency, performance, handling, tow, payload, nvh, with ePTO.
When will the other non-Tesla OEMs cut their teams lose to create more very compelling PEVs?  It does seem like jag truly is trying with the iPace.
--
Regards,
Dave
Thanks for sending the CR link. Very good podcast.

We had Charlie Freese in here yesterday, he runs GM’s fuel cell efforts. He made an interesting comment on electrification: everyone loses money on their PHEVs, BEVs and FCEVs. The trick, as a manufacturer, is to not be too early with this technology but also not to be too late. I think right now most OEMs see this as too early. But in a few years that’s going to change.

John McElroy
6-1-2018


Yes that is an interesting comment.  
It would be very interesting to learn from Sandy Munro whether the losses are from  simply not having the volumes to recover the fixed costs invested.. or not recovering fixed costs AND not covering their variable mfg costs. 
 
I get the impression right now that GM is probably generating cash from each sale of a Bolt EV ( revenue minus mfg costs positive) but they don’t expect the volumes to be high enough to recover their capex fixed costs for the program.  This is what frustrates some finance savvy folks is that if the problem is not covering the fixed costs then why not try to actually advertise and boost sales volumes to finally recover the cost?   I have never seen a Bolt EV commercial on TV nor a Volt commercial past the 1st year 2011 in our area despite it being EV friendly. 
 
I wonder if there are other inputs to the financial analysis that create a catch 22.  Maybe with fixed advertising budgets they look the marginal corporate profit for a shift to the Bolt EV and with  the cost of mainstream TV advertising it is better to hawk trucks and SUVs? 
 
Also, I wonder how much outsourced to the supply base affects this.  When Tesla and VW do more in house, does this change the ROI for advanced technology ?
 
It may be good for incumbents of the existing technology but It’s a problem for society when the structure of an industry is such that there are impediments to the development and deployment of new beneficial technologies.   
You’ve never seen a Tesla ad, either.

Today much more advertising spend is digital. More money is going to car buying sites. I was doing a search for a Fiesta and got ads popping up for the Leaf and later for the Prius. I imagine Chevy is doing the same thing with the Bolt.

With only 0.6% market share no automaker is going to spend millions on tv ads for their EVs.

Besides, consumers will find what they want. Ford launched the Ecosport in January with zero advertising or marketing and no media coverage. Yet it found thousands of buyers instantly.

John McElroy
6-1-2018


My name is Maurice Pharand and I live at my summer cottage where mice are a common problem.  I was planning on buying a new car this fall, (but in the process of doing some research) I came across several legal class actions regarding electrical problems caused by rodents chewing on the electrical wiring inside car engines.  Apparently, this has been an ongoing problem since 2006.  Do you know what the car manufacture are currently doing to alleviate this problem or invite representatives from the various manufactures to advise us accordingly?
 
Here is a website that further explains the potential problems.
 
Cheers
 
Maurice Pharand
This is not a new problem. Rodents and other small animals have been nesting in cars ever since cars appeared over 100 years ago. In winter time, many like to snuggle up in a warm engine compartment.

While mice chewing on wiring harnesses attracts media attention, this is not a widespread problem. It should not prevent you from buying a new car.

John McElroy
6-1-2018


Hi,
 
  I'm a big fan of your show and especially the interview skills of John McElroy.  A skilled interviewer like him is rare, and he certainly stands out and makes the show enjoyable.
 
  I was particularly impressed with your recent show #2211, the interview with Rande Somma: so much that I have ordered his book.
 
  The whole subject of the short-term view of CEOs and board of directors completely reminded me of the Nortel Networks story, which was a big deal here in Ottawa (I'm a radio frequency design engineer who used to work at Nortel, here in Ottawa).
 
   In my opinion, the former CEO, John Roth, had no incentive to put Nortel on the correct and healthy long-term path: rather, his stock option incentives were all geared to the short-term goal of raising the stock price over the period of a few years to 'cash in', which he did.  All of the industry 'hype' at that time (2000) was around optical networks, and it was that 'frenzied' bubble, and his decision to throw Nortel's resources in that direction that drove the stock price up.  When the bubble burst, Nortel fell and never recovered, and I feel that if he and the board of directors had done their jobs, they should have seen this coming.  Instead, Roth ended up with enormous bonuses on his way out the door to retirement.
 
  I'm up in Ottawa, but luckily we get your show on PBS on cable tv.
 
thanks again, and I look forward to more great shows...

Paul
6-1-2018


Ford built the model T.  Depending on the model it averaged 134 inches in length, was 69 inches width and was 73 inches tall.  It had a 100 inch wheel base and approximately 60 inch track front and rear.  It was designated a CAR.
Ford builds the EcoSport.  It is 161 inches long, 70 inches wide and 65 inches tall. It has a 99 inch wheel base and approximately 59 inch track.  It is called a CROSSOVER and or an “SUV”.



I contend that Ford is still in the CAR business.  The top hat of the EcoSport "SUV" is actually not so different to the Model T, A CAR.  In today's vernacular the model T would be a truck since it was body on frame.

 
Whats in a name anyway.
 
Regards

Glenn
5-18-2018


John,

I enjoy your daily program with accurate and timely news.

Today, you showed six engines Antonov AN-225 photo with Russian Space Shuttle “Buran” for Ford’s recovery effort for their F150 supplier’s (Meridian Magnesium Products of America) fire damage.
Actually, the airplane they used was 4 engines Antonov AN-124 which smaller than AN-225 which only one operating plane exists.

This is just for your reference.

Best regards,

Jin
5-18-2018


John McElroy,
 
AUTONOMUS DRIVING CARS…

3 Questions:

1) Will they dodge pot holes in the road around the Detroit area?

2) Where there is water over the road (2 inches or 2 feet) will the car stop or go through it?

3) If the bridge is washed out on the road I am traveling, will the car drive us into the abyss or stop?
 
John
John,

1. In the early days AVs will probably slow way down for potholes, not dodge them.
2. If an AV has any questions it always err on the side of safety. If water covers the road, it will probably turn around and find another route.
3. If a bridge is missing the AV will stop.

Keep in mind that AVs will soon be electronically talking to other cars via V2V and getting information from them on road conditions. It will know about most problems ahead of time.

John McElroy
5-18-2018


Mik Wind...
Here is my 2 cents on this topic: I work doing software to program these cobots, most of our big customers are automotive. The thing is, our marketing department CEO and sales like to sell this idea that this will be making jobs because it sells, but those of us in engineering/development know that isn't true. Even this idea that you'll need specialists to program the robots is a fallacy, anyone using our software can program truly complex robot programs using vision and force control.
5-18-2018


John,
 
I watch your show Autoline After Hours every weekend down under in Perth, Western Australia & I congratulate you on the show & its content although I feel a little more exposure related to Electric Vehicles is warranted.
 
I look forward each week to view your show.
 
In last week show you made mention about Toyota using sewage gas to power vehicles in Los Angeles or Long Beach.
 
This is not a new concept & I detail below two applications from the late 19th Century & 1959 both from London in the UK.
 
Based on the rapid change in the Automotive Industry of late you may find this YouTube Video by Tony Seba: Clean Disruption - Energy & Transportation of interest.
 
Available here.
 
As part of the introduction Tony shows a photo of 5th Avenue New York City in 1900 & asks Where is the car?  Only one visible. He then shows a photo of 5th Avenue New York City in 1913 & asks Where is the horse?  Only one visible.
 
If transportation changes occurred that fast 100 years ago then how fast will it change today.
 
The video is well worth 1 hour of you valuable time.
 
During Worlds War 1 & 2 in the UK, Europe & also in Australia & other areas where gas/petroleum was rationed Coal Gas was used to power Motor Vehicles & Trucks.

Additional Gas Powered Vehicle photos available online.
 
Ruston & Hornsby now called Ruston & [ now part of the Siemens Group of Germany ] Gas turbines were first produced in 1952.
 
In 1959, it opened a new type of power plant using waste sewage gas that powered eight turbines at Britain's biggest sewage works at the Northern Outfall Sewer at Beckton in east London. This was an 18,000 horsepower combined heat and power plant.
 
Full details here.
 
Sewage Gas was also used to power Gas Street Lighting in the late 19th Century
 
Details online Titled Farting Lane.
 
Lurking around the back of the world famous Savoy lies an ingenious – if not slightly nauseating – piece of Victorian engineering; London’s last remaining sewage lamp.
 
The Webb Patent Sewer Gas Lamp was invented in the late 19th century by the Birmingham inventor Joseph Webb. In London the lamps were used for two main reasons; firstly to burn off the smells and germs from London’s sewer system, and secondly as a low cost, low maintenance way to keep London lit up at night.
 
I am hopeful that this email actually reaches your desk.
 
Please advise should you have any queries or require clarification of the information provided or require additional details.
 
Regards, Laurie – The eternal optomist
5-18-2018


Laurie,
 
Thanks for all the fantastic information and links, much appreciated. We love our Australian viewers!
 
You’ve given us some great leads for some stories to do in Autoline Daily.
 
BTW, as an EV fan, if you missed the After Hours show with Sandy Munro there is a ton of Tesla info in there. And check out the show with Don Runkle too for more of a contrarian view.
 
John McElroy
5-18-2018


John,
 
With the Takata airbag recall being such a large recall, and a few OEMs have gone door to door to beg customers to repair their cars, it makes me wonder if the US public really cares all that much about airbags. My thoughts are actions (or in this case lack there of) speaks louder than words.
 
David
The problem is that a certain percentage of the public just doesn’t care about recalls. As long as their car works fine, they’re not going to take it to the dealer. This has been true since recalls first started. It didn’t just start with airbag recalls.

John McElroy
5-18-2018


Hi John,
 
3D printing is as simple as printing a letter; but the finished parts is just incredible as the US Marines have used a 3D printer to manufacture a component needed to keep their F-35 fighter jet flying or Aerojet Rocketdyne using a 3D printer to print the combustion chamber for their RL-10 rocket motor.
 
Mike
5-18-2018


As an update on the sun visor Sean profiled on today's show, he mentioned that it was available on Amazon for $12. It appears that it is now being sold only as a 2-pack for $19.99. However, it is available on the TuckVisor web site as a single, double or 4 pack.



Chuck
5-18-2018


John, the extended duty cycles of vehicles in the mobility fleet do not have an impact on development requirements because of the business models. Ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft generally do not buy vehicles (except for experimental models), and that probably won't change as it keeps a large capital and maintenance expenditure off their books. Instead the onus is on drivers to keep their vehicles well-maintained and in service. I would expect the switch to autonomous vehicles to change only that these "owner-drivers" will be offered vehicles to lease they don't have to drive themselves. In some markets drivers are required to follow taxi vehicle regulations, but automakers are experienced in that market already and haven't had to change their development standards. While autonomy may add double or triple the miles of a typical taxi (assuming current 8-12 hr shift and even demand round the clock, highly doubtful), as long as the major services maintain their capital-light software+owner-driver model they won't have durability demands you envision. That would require "drivers" who operate a large enough fleet of vehicles professionally enough that they take notice of the economics of maintenance and depreciation and have the buying power to demand improvements. The only services at the moment who may do that are car-sharing services, most of which seem to be operated by the automakers themselves. The rest will at most think "If I get an electric I won't have these service expenses." Again, daily rental companies have had higher utilisation for decades, and have not had the dramatic impact on durability you envision. They're more concerned with initial capital cost and just price in the replacement cycle. Even if they could demand vehicles with greater durability they can keep longer, they don't see the value. Competitive pressure means any saving just gets cut out of what they can charge. If you can make money you don't care how often you replace your vehicle - a new vehicle is a competitive advantage - and if you can't it's because there are too many competitors and you won't reap the benefit of a more durable vehicle anyway - only your customers will.
Andrew,

You raise good points but I’d add this.

The daily rentals don’t care about long-term durability because they sell their vehicles once they hit 30,000 miles. They don’t mind doing oil changes and replacing wiper blades, but before a car needs new tires, brakes, shocks, etc. they dump it.

London cabs are the perfect example of what I’m talking about for ride sharing. They are purpose built cars that are made to last. About 40% of London cabs are 10-20 years old. That’s the kind of vehicle the fleets that operate the ride sharing cars will want.


John McElroy
5-18-2018


John:
 
Here’s some very positive feedback on the Autoline TV recorded on the NADA Show NADA Live stage.
 
I thought it turned out great.  Thanks again for invioting me to be part of it.
 
You will see below, my counterpart in Hawaii, David Rolf, was very impressed with the program.
 
Tim


Tim,
 
Mahalo for sending this pithy, on-point, fact-filled discussion on the future of the auto industry.
 
The interviewer, John McElroy’s brilliant questions elicited mind-expanding thoughts from Penske’s Rob Kurnick, former NADA chair Mark Scarpelli and you, representing the dealers in Colorado.  
 
This automotive panel interview was like a great stained glass window of words.  
 
I just wanted to stand back and take it all in.  
 
I’m speaking to a group of University of Hawaii Engineering Dept. professors and a group of elected officials on May 21.  
 
I’ll incorporate as many of the the thoughts expressed by the AutoLine This Week panelists as I can in my 20 min. presentation here in Hawaii. 
 
I think too, that I would like to play this on the big screen at our HADA convention in October.   We hope to bring in Glenn Mercer on the future of the dealership…and this would be a good introduction. 
 
Much, much thanks Tim for sending this. 
 
I sat in an easy chair this Saturday morning, with a cup of coffee and enjoyed every minute of it.  
 
Aloha and best,
Dave Rolf
5-18-2018


John
Show today was a real interesting, enjoyed it.  Steve Miller has had certainly an interesting automotive career and diverse to say the least.  He reminded me a lot of Bob Lutz.  Really the true believers and few and far between coming up.
Regards
Chuck
5-18-2018


John and panel,
 
With Ford announcing the reduction in passenger cars, FCA only having 3 models and GM doing some trimming of models, do you think the Detroit 3 are in for any problems with the price rise in gasoline like they were in 73-74 Arab Oil Embargo? They have seemed to put all their eggs into the truck and SUV basket.
 
Barry
Dropping most of their passenger cars in the American market is a risk for Ford and FCA—and any other OEM that does this. But today’s CUVs get fuel economy close to that of cars, and soon there will be 48v hybrid, strong hybrid, PHEV and BEV versions of CUVs. That does not take the risk away but it reduces it considerably.

John McElroy
5-18-2018


John,

On "Ask Autoline" today you mentioned that you were going to look at a Fiesta ST (or maybe you said Focus ST) for your next car.  I am very interested in your thoughts on this as I am looking at a Fiesta ST (white with black wheels) at my local dealer.  Being 56 years old, I am a bit concerned about the 'boy racer' looks of the car, but somehow it still appeals to me.  Looking forward to your insight on this car.

Thanks

Scott-in-Cleveland
Scott,

Yeah, I ran out after the show today and bought a Fiesta ST. I've always liked the car; it's one of the best enthusiast cars for the money, especially now. Ford is heavily discounting them since it's dropping the car, and dealers are eager to get rid of cars with manual transmissions because they're hard to sell. I got the color they call magnetic, with the base wheels and unpainted calipers so it's kind of understated. Also, I'm looking at de-badging it to make it even more understated.

John McElroy
5-18-2018


John,
 
Hey guys love the AD show and often comment under the name lambo2015.
Anyway I was watching Nova on PBS May 2nd, about new battery development. It was being done at Michigan University and showed the explosive effects of puncturing a Lithium ion battery. They have developed a solid state battery that uses plastic film as a separator rather than a fluid. They actually took a cell phone size battery and cut it with scissors without any adverse effects.
This could be a huge improvement for EV safety as they claim in the show.  It was a very interesting program.  Would be a great show if you could get someone on your show to demonstrate this technology.  Thought you would enjoy the show if you have time. 

Robert
Robert,

Thanks for sending this. We’re working on doing an Autoline this Week show on future EV batteries, so this helps!

John McElroy
5-18-2018


Hi John,
 
The United States has protected itself against what happens in the Middle East after the crisis of the 1970s which means what Iran does will have little effect especially when the United States can count on Saudi Arabia and Iraq to increase oil output.
 
Mike
5-18-2018


John,
 
Is Tesla still selling their carbon credits to other car manufacturers?
 
Barry
Barry,

Yes Tesla sells EV credits to other automakers. It earns over $200 million a year selling them.

John McElroy
5-18-2018


Regarding California having a different fuel mileage standard and sales in adjacent states. In the 90s that was the case with California and Nevada. The Reno dealers only ordered California standard vehicles so they could sell to California residents, problem solved. In other words the dealers have been down this road before.



Chuck & Genrich
5-18-2018


Gentlemen,
 
Not rolling back CAFE standards.  The opposition adds show 1970s standards under Trump.  That is not so, but this kind language misleads the public to thinking it is.  Yes, your suggestion of the 2020-2025 standards to be extended 5 to 10 years makes sense.
 
You also restate what your Mazda guest has stated on ICE efficiency and potential vs electric storage/recycling and generation.  We are going down a better road than China, or reactionary EU.
 
Your smart phone point for pedestrian mishaps is certainly valid.  I must add that in the last fifteen years there has been considerable confusion added by state laws on pedestrian rights.
We grew up by our mothers warning of keeping out or taking extra car when crossing streets that sometimes took experience to reinforce.
 
Now, the state tells pedestrians cars are supposed to stop when a pedestrian steps into the street.  This is confusing to drivers who do not expect it and don’t react in time.  Yes, we are to watch out, but for many people, as pedestrians, it is not their training.  It has nothing to do with SUVs.  AAA is purely political, by the way.
 
I will not cross, even a parking lot way unless the driver tells me so, or there are no cars.
 
This state intervention also causes problems for 10 mph bicycles who now have the right to the whole lane under state law.  With the exception of activists, most cyclists share the road.
 
That RAM grows on me and if they have a configuration that gets 20/30 mpg efficiency, it would be the first pickup to tempt me.  My gripe with new cars and minivans is the 4 1/2” ground clearances that can lift a vehicle from traction in heavy snow and damage the under carriage on dirt roads or damaged streets.  The Outback and the like are an alternative.
 
Gary’s mention of the RAM’s nimbleness in a parking lot was what I wanted to hear.  And, the engineer's mention of the new HVAC system, increased payload (a RAM deficiency) and corrosion protection were also necessary to hear.
 
Gee John, did you have an expresso before the show?  I did too, so… I kind of understand.
 
rwork
5-11-2018


A 2000 Toyota RAV4 has almost the same profile, length and width as a 1929 Ford Model A Sedan (the Model A is taller).  They are both 4 cylinder, 2 row, 2 wheel drive, vehicles. Yet people call the Model A “a car” and the RAV4 an “SUV” or “CUV”. Maybe the whole car vs SUV sales debate reflects a problem with definitions.
 
Neil G
5-11-2018


Why Ford is dropping cars? My guess, Ford is factoring in impact of the Achates OPGCI engine to enable mid size SUVs to get small car mpg.
5-11-2018


I assume that the auto companies have finally figured out why SUV/CUV sales are going gang busters & car sales are not. 
For me, a baby boomer, it all has to do with seat height & how easy it is to slide into the vehicle & get out. The new cars are fabulous, but this aspect, seat height, is ignored. Obviously a lot of buyers feel the same way. 
My comparison with cars would be back in the mid 1950’s. Look at a 1956  Chev or Ford & how easy that they were to get into or out of. 
I feel, as a baby boomer & we have lots of financial clout, that this is the main problem. 

Clyde
5-11-2018


Hi John,
 
I was listening to your recent AAH episode where you said that the rise of car sharing will lead to greatly increased lifespans of cars. I doubt it, because if taxicabs aren't built to last a million miles now, I don't see what extra incentive there is to make other shared cars last that long. And for decades there have been dedicated manufacturers of Taxis, along with cars that have a huge portion of their sales volume going to taxis or police fleets (Ford Crown Victoria being the poster child). Its my understanding that those cars don't last substantially longer than the average passenger car. Twice as long? Maybe, but a lot of that is probably more regular maintenance & inspection versus being designed and built for more severe duty. 
 
On a tangential note, one thing that I haven't been able to figure out with the fight over whether Uber or other similar services should be allowed to operate in a city is this: why aren't these 'ride hailing' services simply classed as a taxi service. They drive a person from point A to point B for a fee, just like a taxi. So why not just treat them as such & tell Uber (or whoever) to either play by those rules or go somewhere else. Rant over.
 
 
Looking forward to next weeks show
 
-Davin
I think London cabs are the best example of what ride sharing companies will want in their cars: purpose built vehicles with easy ingress and egress, gobs of head, hip and leg room, an amazingly tight turning radius, and made to last. About 40% of London cabs are 10-15 years old.

Ride hailing companies are classified differently from taxis because their drivers are considered independent contractors who offer their services when it strikes their fancy. Taxi drivers are full time employees of the taxi companies. The argument you pose is the one the taxi companies raise, but so far they’ve lost most of those arguments.

John McElroy
5-11-2018


John, I love your show but do not agree with you that the government should raise taxes on energy to bend consumer behavior in such a way as to change free market exchange.  I know the government does it all the time but I have a hard time finding success stories to cite.  What I find is a complex tax code, special cut outs and all sorts of ways that people get around the intended purpose of a tax to get people to do whatever.

Taxes should raise revenue to run government.  Period.  If co2 is a problem regulate it directly and let the market react.  A three way bank shot by government taxation  is not the way to solve the problem.  What ever the problem I have faith of three hundred million Americans making free market decisions more that a government tax scheme.



GW
GW,

I don’t follow the logic that regulations are better than taxes. A gas tax is very simple. A carbon tax is very simple. Regulations for CO2 are extremely complicated. Take a look at the California ZEV mandate. It is Byzantine. Even the experts struggle to explain how it works.

I do like the idea of cap and trade, provided it is a well regulated, transparent market. The EPA used this approach will electric utilities in the 1990s to reduce SO2 emissions and it worked better than anybody expected with both utilities and environmentalists happy with the results.

John McElroy
5-11-2018


I really enjoy your videos on You Tube. I was wondering if you could help me. I have invented a new type of two stroke engine where I have eliminated the need to add lubricant to the fuel. I was wondering if you knew someone in the industry that would be willing to help me build the prototype. If you are interested in knowing more, I will be glad to show you the design after you sign a NDA.

I have engineered a new method for the exhaust gases to leave the cylinder. There are no ports in the cylinder. The piston and the piston cylinder are lubricated by the oil in the crankcase just like a four stroke engine. I have also engineered a way to have more torque applied to the crankshaft with each stroke. But the best part of this new design is that it is not complicated. This could be the next great advancement in 2T technology. I have included a pdf file of the crankshaft for the first prototype to show you that I have already done more than just a few sketches.

Thank you and have a great day!

Ted Wiley
Ted,

Thanks for your letter.

There are a couple of engineering firms that would be more than happy to build a prototype engine for you, but it would be completely at your expense. Roush, Ricardo and AVL come to mind. There are a lot of other race engine companies that have the capability to do this.

Also, Achates is the only other company I’m aware of that’s working on a two stoke engine.

John McElroy
5-11-2018


It's over and you guys don't have a clue. Tesla and those that follow in their wake will take over the auto industry which, even you have figured out, is in decline.
Regarding Tesla you simply haven't a clue. You chortle and laugh at their mistakes but don't understand that they can make them and recover from them
before the boys in Detroit have finished the front nine.
 
Your guests are all like 80 living a past reality, that has some reference to current time, but only as a shadow of the past.
You guys didn't see any of this coming, what a joke. The 15% will probably be exceeded in CA, as Model 3 will be in full
production by then, and there will be a number of decent alternatives.
Still, I admit I watch since you know a lot about the history of the automotive industry, and soon, in my view, you will be part of it.
 
Sure ice trucks will hang on for a while, then go phev, but where are going to sell them besides the America's?


-- 
Little Bob
Interesting point of view. We’ll publish this in the Viewer Mail section of our website so others can read it too.

In the meantime want to bet a cup of coffee over whether or not Tesla goes bankrupt next year?

John McElroy
5-4-2018


John,
 
I agree with your take on today’s Autoline Daily. I posted my thoughts on a friend’s website:
 
Quick take is that the present suit is frivolous. On its face, the complaint contains the seeds for its ultimate dismissal. Perhaps it’s a Hail Mary by a company (Nikola) that’s about to go under.

Will
5-4-2018


John



Ask autoline is awesome...I never seem to catch the show live but I wanted to let you know I enjoy the show..



I'm old so let me know ow I would find out when these " Ask Autoline" ahead of time so I can plan to ask a question if I have one...



Today I was working out at the gym and I think I got so,e kind of message but I didn't know what the hell was going on...



Some of your viewers are older and we are slow to these new formats...



Give us a heads up on the day of the week if possible 

Anyways...

either way the shows cool as is all of autoline.tv



Keep up the great work



Jonathan Brown
Jonathan,

Great to hear from you and thanks for the feedback.

We just started Ask Autoline and are still experimenting with it. But your suggestion is a good one, we’ll provide more advanced notice of when it’s coming on.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


John
I like the ask AutoLine segment.. good rapid fire.
 
On oil prices...   Even with fracking I am hesitant to say there won’t ever be short or medium term price spikes.  Over the long term, yes, supply will come back into balance.  But it would seem that there could be disruptions that could spike prices that could be scarey 
 
And there are a number of countries that target oil prices of $60-$100/BBL ( Saudi Arabia and Russia).   There certainly has been a fracking boom.  But elsewhere over the past few years of low oil prices has dried up E&P investment.  Sooner or later existing wells deplete and new investment is required.
Without new investment, supply can be reduced.  Oil production is like a coke machine. You put money in and get oil out for a while.  Once you drink all the oil/coke you have to put more money in the slot. No new coins, no new coke bottles.
 
We may see gasoline prices firm up over $3/Gallon.  It certainly seems like $4/gallon is a clear threashild  where consumers start changing buying or driving habits.  But could the actual threashold be around $3.50/gallon ? 
 
And your point is that this time the market reaction will be that drivers buy a PHEV or BEV CUV instead of a passenger car?  That way they get the vehicle type they want and still mitigate gas price increases with some electricification ?
Dave,

If oil prices were going to spike they would have done so in 2014 when ISIS came on the scene. Just think of what’s going on in the Middle East right now: Syria in a full blown civil war, Turkey invading part of Syria, the Israelis bombing Syria, the Saudis bombing Yemen, most of the Arab league quarantining Qatar, and the Iranians trying to foment unrest in the region. A decade ago this would have triggered a major run on oil. Yet none of this had an impact on oil prices because of US fracking.

So far the US is the only country fracking, but this can be done in other countries like Mexico and Argentina which have the right geological conditions. And there are new fracking techniques that promise (threaten?) to unlock greater reserves. There’s a lot of interest in using micro waves instead of water in fracking.

Yes oil prices are going up somewhat, thanks to OPEC trying to manipulate the market. But we’ve seen in the past that if prices go up slowly, Americans don’t change their car buying habits very much. It’s all about the rate of change. If prices were to suddenly jump to $4 a gallon, sales of SUVs would plummet while everyone runs out to buy a Prius.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


Thanks John!
 
No worries, excellent reporting as usual!
 
BTW: Your through coverage on the Munroe Tesla 3 breakdown was fair, objective and comprehensive.  Although, not well received by some Tesla circles (websites), from what I viewed/read it was more related to the direct language used by Munroe in describing his findings in part one.  But it was appreciated the way Autoline balanced the subsequent reporting by emphasizing the excellent tech work, while still reporting perceived flaws.  Good job!
 
Perhaps soon we’ll see more reporting on comparisons between Tesla Model X and Jag I-Pace EV.   
 
Best, Kip
5-4-2018


Thanks to the Autoline team for adding the upcoming TV racing schedule news as per April20 show.  You guys do a great job, and been a fans for many years.  However, you blew this announcement BIG TIME….The TV schedule is appreciated by the racing fans, but you opened the segment with F1 race promo, then proceeded to list upcoming races this weekend, all except the F1 Azerbaijan GP April 29, on ESPN2, the most exciting race of 2017, after teasing us with the promo.
 
Com’on Man!! 
 
There are a few of us F1 fans in your audience, show us some “S.P.E.C.T”
 
Keep up the good work,
Kip
Kip,

Good to hear from an F1 fan. We got the promo for the Azerbaijan race in Friday’s Autoline Daily.

And we’ll have top results from the weekend racing in today’s show.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


John, 

Have you considered that Ford may be trimming its lineup because the rules of origin may change under the NAFTA negotiations? If the rules of origin change Ford's cars might not be able to be imported from Mexico to the US tariff free, unless they start investing in more factories(expensive). Therefore, it will be more profitable to import the cars from China and pay the tariff(less expensive). 
 
I feel this is reasonable because, dropping the small car and sedan model line may cause them to be ill-prepared for an increase in gasoline prices. 
 
-Ben 
5-4-2018


Hi John,
 
I remember talking about what you had said which was that there’s no such thing as a ZEV given that nearly most of the electricity generated in this country comes from the consumption of fossil fuels; it’ll be interesting to see countries in Europe like Germany deal with their efforts to develop the electricity necessary for over 1 Million EV. 
 
Wind farms is a possibility; but it’s something that every country in Europe needs to begin if they want EV by 2025.
 
The US will most likely go electric also; but given the size of this country, we’re going to need additional time to build the infrastructure so everyone doesn’t have an experience like your weekend with a Nissan Leaf. 
 
Mike
5-4-2018


Hi Guys!
 
Really like your show! 
I saw the teardown of Tesla Model 3.
Do you guys have any more detail on what producer of the battery cells or what kind of material it is made of? :-) 
Would be cool to know if they are using local California Lithium Battery.
 
Have a nice weekend guys!
//Mats Westerholm, Sweden
Panasonic makes all the 2170 lithium-ion cells for Tesla. Panasonic is a major investor in Tesla’s gigafactory.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


Just watched AAH with the discussion about Ford dropping their sedans. In the near future they may be just a mobility company (whatever that means) that also makes trucks. The Mustangs can only be described as a niche auto. From the numbers Gary was mentioning it appears that there are at least a million sedans being sold every year. Finally, no mention was made of the fact that Ford's CEO is neither a car guy or a finance guy, but just another gun for hire.



Chuck
5-4-2018


Congratulations on this program. (ATW #2212)



The safety aspects of color can be a matter of life or death importance.
5-4-2018


Hi guys great show as always, I think the reason Ford's cars don't sell well is they frankly don't keep them updated. Compare the current fusion with even the previous gen Honda Accord or Toyota Camry and it's miles behind. That said I can't blame then for focusing on trucks, but what happens when gas goes back up?

Thanks
Frank
Gas prices are highly unlikely to spike like they have in the past. Fracking is a game changer. New fracking techniques using micro waves could unlock more oil and gas.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


Ford announced they'll shed most US passenger car models over the next four years.
 
Sure, it's the right move -- crossovers are more profitable and a growing segment, and Ford's cars were already old or middling --
 
But...
 
Will Ford lose much overall market share through the next 2-5 years, and will Wall Street punish them for it?
 
(Last year Ford sold almost 210,000 Fusions, and another 114,000 between Fiesta, Taurus, and MKZ -- still a good chunk of sales. Ford's crossover lineup is already pretty deep -- how much more of that market can they pick up? Meanwhile, VW just unveiled a new American Passat, despite selling only 60,000 last year.)
 
--Chet
Yes, Ford will lose market share after it drops all these car models. Toyota will probably permanently surpass it in the US market. But Ford will likely emerge as a more profitable company that is not incinerating capital and Wall Street will reward it for that.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


Autoline,

Thanks for all the video content and information, I really enjoy the shows and news. One thing I have not heard about was the obvious problem I see coming were it seems that every EV has its own type of charger port. My question is do you think legislation in the US will come that establishes a universal plug for all OEMs to use? You don't get a different gas filling nozzle for every every brand you buy currently. I think a massive pain will come if all OEMs don't come together and put their money together and produce or agree on a universal charging port or infrastructure. 

Thanks !
The SAE has already set a standard for Level I and II chargers called J1772, and a standard for Level III chargers called CHAdeMO. All automakers have standardized on these plugs except Tesla, which came up with a different plug that no one else can use.

John McElroy
5-4-2018


Heard your show about the Model 3. You’re welcome to come down to Atlanta and drive mine. 

Joe
5-4-2018


Why are you making a drama when an EV is called zero emissions?  You say it's unethical to call them that way. You didn't say anything when VW and partners tested their engines with animals and possibly humans.

thanks.
You must have missed out coverage of the diesel testing. The story ran at the end of January, 2018.

Sean McElroy
5-4-2018


John, 
 
Watched AAH on replay till the picture went black - don't trust you guys to stop with the interesting info just because you turn your microphones off.
 
Sandy Munro is gold - no wonder companies want to buy his reports. I expect the industry majors have tear-down capacity in-house. Language issues probably account for some of foreign customers. But I expect Munro and Associates is the industry tear-down leader.
 
People cheer Tesla and SpaceX because of the things they are successful at - they push the automotive/space envelope - they are technology leaders - that circuit board blew my mind. 
 
Tesla is leading in key facets of the automobile of the future - the fanboys are cheering leadership - many spend too much time online and not enough on their social skills. An internet lesson is to figure out what is being cheered, and ignore the crap driven by poor social skills.
 
"BOB" - blindfolded one-armed builder - brilliant, "Cobots" likewise.  dirty/dangerous/drudgery = robot job, to hell with RoI - Yeah, Sandy.
 
Robot must grip part and never let go to job done - or end up covered in plastic out back - more Sandy gold.
 
Elon says stuff - both fact and nonsense - need to apply commonsense test, past performance and industry practice - 24/7 is nonsense - 24/6 is best we could expect with one overtime shift per week. Machines likely need checking every couple of hours.
 
Thanks for the industry info on volumes and shifts. 1,000 per day at 1 minute cycle time will take 16.67 hours. A 16 hour day would mean 57.6 second cycle time. Perhaps 960 per day is normal for a 16 hour day???
 
Panel fit issues are forgivable when Sandy Munro says his team is hauling out X-ray machines to check out amazing circuit board components. The Russian and Chinese military labs, if they have not already, will be paying people to buy/steal Model 3s to send the power and automation electronics home in diplomatic bags. I expect Sandy gave away military secrets when he compared the circuit board to military equipment.
 
Tesla should contract out "body-in-white", final paint and assembly as the panel implied. Tesla fanboys don't care who assembled a mass-produced vehicle as long as it has the good stuff. All cars are now imported into Australia - we want to know brand Ford/Toyota/etc, but we don't care where the factory is.
 
Sandy, being very busy, has possibly missed a bigger picture with Tesla's body design - Tesla wants to present autopilot as 3.7 (and greater) times safer than other cars. Perhaps most of that comes from an extra strong body and is nothing to do with vehicle automation. You should ask Sandy if Tesla has deliberately aimed to beat key body strength test standards by a significant margin to ensure lower deaths and injuries.
 
Elon is proud of Model 3 body weight achievement. I'm amazed he went with a steel sandwich of mild/ultra high/high strength in body sections given bodies are not a Tesla forte.
 
No doubt Sandy could still cut weight and cost out of a Tesla and still achieve the extra body safety. 
 
That steel/plastic wishbone with the extra mass cable-tied on blew my mind. I expect it is a result of early feedback, and they have not got their supplier to modify the part.
 
Tesla's hit/miss quality must have a lot to do with the fact Tesla is the only large auto maker in California - Tesla has to train more people from scratch. It is now hiring 400 people/week for some weeks - I'm not buying the cars the newbies build.
 
Tesla has made the most direct-drive drivetrain it can. While a few people drive/test them to extremes causing internal wear, most people just cruise around in traffic. Tesla will accept some extra warranty work, and more replacement of transmission fluids, to get and keep its reputation for high-performance machines. 
 
That battery module was stunning. All cells the same way up, and glued in with the coolant tube, and clear top and bottom covers. Tesla has ensured the right number of cells in series and parallel simply through current collector plate and bus-bar pattern. The current collectors must be glued on, before the current connector wires are ultrasonically welded on. Then the whole thing is covered in more sealant to protect the wires. With all the time for glues and sealants to set, there has to be storage while it happens. Pics I've seen of the Gigafactory interior show it is mainly storage space. If transformation work stations make up 5% of the factory area, I will eat your hat. Tesla using synchronous assembly is a myth I think - it likely has larger sub-assemblies. Every sub-assembly operation requires storage.
 
The 0.2 milli-amp variation in the 2170 cells is a stunning achievement by Panasonic. An advantage of the battery module structure is that if one of those current wires breaks the other cells keep virtually all the battery capacity. Large battery has 46 cells and parallel, small battery will have 31 cells in parallel - respectively, 2.2% and 3.2% of battery power capacity is lost with a wire/weld break.
 
Sandy reckons 2170 cells have 5.7 to 6 Amp.hour. This is what we would expect if the cells had NCA cathodes like the 18650 cells in the MS/MX vehicles. 
But the attached test report Page 3    Battery energy capacity 230 (Amp.hour). Divide that by the cells in parallel (46) gives 5.0 Amp.hour per cell. 
The cells likely have NMC cathodes at 5 Amp.hour - like other EVs, Tesla Powerwalls/PowerPacks, and like the research field of Tesla's contracted Canadian uni lab.
Multiply 230 Amp.hour by Total Volt (350) = 80500 Watt.hour - total - a "name-plate" capacity I think.        
Page 6 of test report END.SOC 78270 Wh.  Average battery voltage = 351.  78270/351 = 222.99 Amp.hour. - nearly the same as the Integrated Amp.hours = 222.81.    222.81x351 = 78206.31 Wh.
222.81/46 cells in parallel = 4.8437 Amp.hour/cell.   351/96 cells in series = 17.71 Wh/cell --- giving 3.656 V/cell average.

If Sandy finds 5.7 to 6 Amp.hour, it likely means Tesla is producing NCA cathode cells in 2170 format with 21 Wh to  22 Wh per cell.
It means the battery will have 4416x20.84 = 92,030 Wh to 4416x21.94 = 96,890 Wh. This is close to the Model S/X battery capacity of 102,000 Wh - unlikely I think. But Tesla could have artificially limited range - hmmmm!!!
 
So, all those non-employee carparks around the Fremont plant (flyover video) are likely holding cars awaiting rework????????????
 
Liked the OESA interview as well. Mexico has 46 Free Trade agreements and this (plus cheap factory labour) sends assembly plants to Mexico.
 
Trump took the wrong approach with NAFTA and other trade agreements. Trump should have given UN ambassador Nikki Haley a second job of taking the names of US companies with factories in Mexico. After a stern lecture on live TV, she would of had their job repatriation plan in her hands within a month. 
 
$1.50/hr to 2.50/hr is not every auto plant in Mexico. I understand some are paying $6 to $8 per hour (but can't find my source). Some of these key facts that are easy to recall deep into an interview need a solid base otherwise they colour everything.  Autoline Daily (Sean) does a great job of sticking to facts with a solid base.
 
Can't always watch the show each day, but make a point to catch up if I miss some. 
 
Regards
Peter
5-4-2018


You know the Maybach concept isn't the first SUV with a rear bump.  Howabout the MKT? ...that is practically orphaned by it's creator.  It is much better looking on a very good vehicle, but totally ignored.  It's the one Lincoln I'd love.  The Flex is cool, but the MKT evokes the design pinnacle of 1939.
5-4-2018


I can't find separate sales numbers on the Regal Tour X.  Can you tell me how it’s selling? 
Our local dealers never seem to have one on the lot.

Michael
There are no sales numbers and you haven’t seen them on dealer lots because they’re not available yet.

But we are as interested as you are!

John McElroy
4-27-2018


FFFFFFFF"'NNNNNNNNNN"GGGGGGGGGG" OUTSTANDING  Monroe report on TESLA!!!!!!  YOU GUYS RULE !!!!!! Youngblood  Cleveland OH
4-27-2018


So will Cadillac move back to Detroit now that de Nysschen is leaving the company?
 
rick - vancouver
Supposedly the decision to move Cadillac to NYC was made before Johann went to GM. So it may stay there. But in the long run we expect Cadillac, which was named after the founder of Detroit, to return to its roots.

John McElroy
4-27-2018


John:

Please explain what the logic is behind limiting AAH to one hour and then continuing the discussion for another 15-30 minutes as if the end of the show never happened??

Ron Paris-
You can watch Autoline After Hours or listen to the podcast. The data shows that keeping AAH to about an hour is optimal for most of the audience. Sometimes we keep talking after the show, sometimes we don’t.

John McElroy
4-27-2018


Can Sandy please show an image which illustrates the structure of the Tesla Model 3 battery modules??
 
Regards
 
Peter
Peter,

We’ll have pictures and video of the batteries to some degree of tear-down, but Munro & Associates was still in the process of taking them apart when we shot it.

John McElroy
4-27-2018


I have to respectfully disagree with John on this one. There are a few reasons for slow BEV adoption... first is that there are so few compelling options on the market. The Bolt is a a great car, I thought about buying one, but its so unattractive and uses such cheap interior that once the EV buzz wears off a person will be disappointed with their purchase. If you look at the attractive looking EV's there is a lineup of people to get them, Tesla Model 3, and Jaguar I-Pace, have thousands of people putting money down to get them ASAP. We ordered an I-Pace that cost $87,470 which is the most I have ever paid for a car, but after seeing the car at the New York auto show, it is that good. Fit and finish similar to my Lexus LX, and electric powertrain to match Tesla, its the first really compelling BEV by anyone other then Tesla. GM needs to get off their rear end, and match it... Even if they lose some money it will be great advertising for the company that is considered by most young people to be a dinosaur. The new twin turbo Cadillac, and mid engine corvette are both a huge waste of corporate capital that should be spent on EV, and advanced technology, that may actually return profit someday. For people who want to argue this point CT6 with its new engine have 3 times the capital investment of the Tesla Model S... Which one sells better? and gets more free press coverage? has happier customers? (all this, and Tesla's fit and finish sucks) hmmm, I hope Mary Barra is paying attention, otherwise GM may need another bailout in the coming decade.

David
4-27-2018


Buick should name their SUV concept, Electra.
Yes!

John McElroy
4-27-2018


What is Today's Lowest Emissions AWD Car?
Probably any PZEV rated Subaru

John McElroy
4-27-2018


Hi John,
 
I didn't even know there was a INDY car or NASCAR race this past weekend; ESPN flashed a commercial for the China F1 event given it was on their network.. while I didn't see a commercial for the other events.  
 
I'm wondering what the heck are these guys doing.. they're competing for viewers as it's the start of the NBA playoffs and MLB.
 
Mike @ San Francisco, CA
Yep, unless you go find out yourself when the races are on, you’re liable to miss them because the networks don’t do a good job of promoting them. Neither do the sanctioning series.

John McElroy
4-27-2018


John:
 
I just watched (and enjoyed) After Hours…sorry it took me so long, family got in the way.
 
A few things I thought about.
 
First, Ford is advertising the EcoSport. Yes, it didn’t seem like it initially, but on the TV shows I watch, there seems to be a good number of “first time” ads for the EcoSport. I’ve counted no fewer than two distinct commercials being run during young shows (basic cable, young demographic shows).
 
Second, you (all of the Autoline shows) have mentioned the slow-selling Volt and the relatively faster-growing sales of the Bolt EV. It seems like a GM push for the Bolt and against the Volt instead of a consumer-driven shift. The Volt is most likely a lower-profit model than the Bolt simply because it’s smaller and doesn’t have an ICE driveline. Outside of your continued argument (on which I agree) that the “green car” market is relatively stagnant (and due for trouble when the market explodes), GM’s move is internal not external.
 
I hope all is well.
 
Sam Fiorani
Vice President
Global Vehicle Forecasting

AutoForecast Solutions LLC
4-27-2018


Hi John,



Any chance you might get Workhorse Trucks on AAH?  The specs on their upcoming W-15 pickup are incredible, almost too incredible to believe.  Now that they've announced that they will be selling to the public I'm interested, but would like learn more about the W-15 and are these impressive claims real.



Thanks,



L. Kimura
4-27-2018


Hey autoline!
      So I went to the Autoshow this year and I watch your show and almost every new car that comes out has a factory radio/infotainment system that looks like it's a tablet sticking right out of the dashboard! This drives me nuts and when are they going to stop this madness!? I don't want to buy a car with that nonsense so my choices are getting pretty slim.  
 
Thanks. 
Jon K. 
Jon,

You’re not the only one who hates that look!

John McElroy
4-27-2018


Hello John.
 
The 2019 Camaro SS refresh is not being received well by Camaro fans. The front in particular is being maligned as horrible, the area of contention is that there is a 'flowtie' right smack in the middle of a thick crossbar which, as simple as it is, throws off the look of the front end.
 
You can do your own investigative journalism to check on reaction to the refresh, and even use your own eye for detailed styling to make an informed opinion on the matter.
 
Camaro fans are fuming...
4-27-2018


John,
 
Lincoln is surely the most service oriented vehicle maker in the world - Rolls Royce included. Surely, we will see a Lincoln hire car service. A lot of people will want not only a driver for their car on special occasions, but a car with the driver. As a luxury service company, Lincoln has a great future.
 
Ford Mobility, now that it has spread from Chariot to medical transport, is succeeding in identifying new markets for service. Its analytics will be especial useful for Lincoln. 
 
All the majors will have to ditch a number of models to cut costs. All the polarising changes to vehicle appearance reduce brand loyalty. Like Ram and Jeep, it is better to stick to what makes customers loyal to the brand. 
 
Companies will survive buying in key components, rather than being technology leaders/producers, as long as they produce product people want relative to other product in the market. 
 
The Tier 1s, which will include Google, will ensure ensure brand/marketing oriented companies have the components they need to succeed. 
 
Peter
4-27-2018


The $3k initial premium and the $3k battery replacement kills the hybrid advantage.
 
A 40 mpg hwy, ICE hits the mark.
4-27-2018


Where are the diesel commercials for cruze and equinox/terraine.  Gm will say it failed but no one knows what these cars can do and diesel enthusiasts want more torque and power.  The old cruze diesel was so much more torquey. 



I have the 4.2 inline6 less modern version of turbo 3.0 bmw and it is still very competitive and useful.  I am stuck with going from gmc envoy to bmwx5 for similar progressive vehicle that can still tow and fit in my garage. Tell me a replacement for 05 envoy. They have become low torque high rpm engines that never achieve full torque but inline 6 and bmw 300 ft lbs at 1300 rpm amazing.  Truck wont fit in my garage. Has to be less than 199inches and grand Cherokees stopped selling the diesel. Big market gap. 



Doug
4-27-2018


Hi John,
 
With the continent of Europe moving to EV or ZEV by 2025; does it make sense for anyone to spend the money to develop 48-volt Mild Hybrids when the move appear to jump totally into electrified vehicles?
 
Mike @ San Francisco, CA
Electrified ICEs (48v) will dominate the automotive market for decades to come. Even by 2040 they will still be the predominant powertrain.

John McElroy
4-27-2018


Picked up Tesla last Saturday and had about a week to drive it around Sacramento/Rocklin/Granite Bay where one of our daughters live. Now in Ventura County staying with wifies dear friend with only one charging stop at Harris Ranch to recharge while having lunch. The trip over the Grape Vine was interesting to drive and watch the energy stay constant for miles as we went down the back side. Going to Santa Paula today to visit relatives where Steve McQueen spent his last years and see some recently discovered McQueen memorabilia. Hope it is not just old dirty socks. Next stop is in Palos Verdes Estates to see wife's brother and start trek East via Hwy 10  to Sebring, FL. Thought I would throw in a little techie video along the way from one of many favorite YouTubers. See link.
 
Take care, Frank
4-27-2018


Dear John, Sean and Company,



Do you all know if General Motors has plans to put the "hands free”, "super cruise” option currently offered in the Cadillac CT6 in other GM vehicles in 2019 or at some other time in the future.



Thank you.



Jack

Ft. Worth, TX
GM didn’t spend all that time and money to develop Super Cruise just to offer it on one model. No doubt the plan is to roll it out to many other models. But it will all hinge on market acceptance. If enough car buyers order it, you’ll see it spread quickly.

John McElroy

Send us your thoughts: viewermail@autoline.tv