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10-16-2014

John,

I think the anti - Tesla legislation, prohibiting direct sales of Tesla cars will be counter productive. The public will not take long to realize this is ultimately a restrictive trade practice to impede competition from a superior product.

Rather the dealer organization with foresight will be approaching Tesla about franchise opportunities, the possibility of which was suggested by Elon Musk. As much as one may dislike a franchise system, perhaps there is no other better alternative for the mass market.

Regards,
Tim Beaumont
10-16-2014

Hi John, being a Brit ex-pat, I still love “right hand drive” and enjoy driving over there when I visit. That’s what we always called it – i.e. the driver “drives” on the right side of the vehicle, nothing to do with the drivetrain. We always used to refer to those weird foreign cars as “left hookers!"

Keep up the good work,
Rgds. Chris
10-16-2014

Hey John,

If the dealer franchise system is so good, why do they need the FORCE of government to prevent Musk from doing it his way?

Vincent A. Joy
As I understand it, it’s not the force of government, it’s the force of law. Franchise protection laws have been around for a very long time. They were enacted to prevent abuses by unscrupulous franchisers. To sidestep these laws, Tesla is appealing to state legislatures to create an exemption for it. And since the franchise laws differ in every state, Tesla has to seek exemptions from all fifty of them.

McElroy
10-16-2014

Nicole was fabulous. So nice to have an attractive woman doing the show all week VS John (no offense John) or other men. Love your shows. Keep up the good work.

Many thanks,

Bill Eichenberger
Automotive enthusiast extreme
Dang! Maybe I should consider dyeing my hair.

McElroy
10-16-2014

John,

Just viewed your lightweighting show on Autoline This Week, and it was a great show. One of your guests mentioned that Honda has not embraced the use of advanced adhesives in their manufacturing processes. So the obvious question is why not?

Joe Pastor
Apparently, Honda’s engineers in Japan do not have much experience in using structural adhesives. Some of them think that using adhesives is not as strong or safe as welding. And since Honda’s existing welding techniques work fine, their attitude is “why change?”

But they will change. Honda is getting a lot of experience using structural adhesives to make the Honda Jet. Also, the upcoming Acura NSX will likely use a lot of adhesives since it will be using different types of materials in its construction.

McElroy
10-16-2014

John, just wanted to say your guest host, Nicole Geverink, did an excellent job this week on the Daily show. See you next week!

Amado Arceo
Saginaw, MI
10-16-2014

Tesla P85D. Sold.

Goodbye Audi, Lexus, Volvo, Cadillac, BMW.

Looking to buy myself something nice to supplement my current 14 year old cars, a 2001 Audi allroad and 2001 Toyota Highlander.

Great show,
Tim Beaumont
10-16-2014

John,

I love the idea of the Hydraulic Hybrid system, but where is it? To date I have seen only 1 UPS truck with "Hydraulic Hybrid" printed on it.

HelicopterJay
They may be slow in coming, but in the meantime check out the website www.lightninghybrids.com



McElroy
10-16-2014

Hello,

I am an avid listener and find your show extremely interesting.

I have just started business school and although I am a physician I have decided to do my marketing term paper on the auto industry.

My project is to look at a specific company. Diagnose their problem and come up with a solution and marketing plan.

I could choose Cadillac but I feel they have great product and will be fine with consistent quality cars and marketing.

I instead chose Lincoln as my company. I feel that they have a long way to go to be relevant.

My question is do you have any suggested resources outside of Google that would help me find data on this brand? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Dill
Dill,

I sure do have a suggestion! Do a “Lincoln” search on the Autoline website. And be on the lookout for the AAH and ATW results that come up. You’ll see interviews we’ve done with some of the top executives, designers and engineers at Lincoln.

McElroy
10-16-2014

John,

It is interesting that so many of the vehicle recalls (especially domestic OEMs) are for model years when there was such an emphasis on cost cutting. But nobody seems to have made the connection or chooses not to mention it. There is a level of cost for most items that one truly can’t drop below for the long haul. If you do, it will someday come back and bite you in the wallet. Vehicle systems and components fit into this category.

RML B-ham
Richard,

Wow, now that you mention it, this seems perfectly obvious. Thanks for pointing it out.

McElroy
10-8-2014

Love the Paris Show Coverage! I want to congratulate all of you for coming up with the idea of making each interview into a separate segment. This is sooo much better than scrolling through everything to pick out the segments that are of interest to me. Good work.

Thanks,
Gavin
10-8-2014

Forget the midsize pickup. We weekend DIY'ers want a small pickup. It should be car-based. I'd accept a Fiat Strada, Holden or Ford Falcon Ute. Think El Camino, Ranchero, or even Subaru Brat. It should be good for daily commute and an occasional trip to Home Depot a few times a year, and fit in the garage. We don't want or need a truck, just a car with the back cut off. Why can't we get one?

Avlisk
Phoenix, AZ
10-8-2014

Hi John,

Love the show. I love cars but absolutely hate some of the new tech mostly centered around phone car interface. Nancy and I have a Ford, Lincoln and Buick and two smart phones. Each vehicle has real problems with connectivity as we move between cars. Also all three seem to fail at resuming the last function (like listening to Autoline daily on stitcher) when you restart the car. Sometimes they do. Most times they don't. And the voice control of functions with any dependability? Expletives deleted! I hope a quiet cabin also means people on the outside can't hear my rants at the otherwise terrific vehicle.

My point: Car reviews should include more time on this function. A few key points: Ease of initial connection. Stability of connection. Frequency of dropped apps or failure to resume. Ease of use of the voice act. system.

I do believe many a buyer of especially higher end cars get a strong dose of cognitive dissonance when the tech is poor, no matter how well the car rides, brakes and handles.

Seat time might be a good platform for your observations here.

Just a thought,
Glenn Watts

(I still miss Ike)
10-8-2014

Dear John,

I am curious as to how difficult (expensive) it is to engineer a RHD model from a traditional LHD car, as in the ‘15 Mustang. I would also like to know which current American models are offered in RHD (Grand Cherokee.....?)

William
Vancouver, Canada
It is quite expensive and time consuming to convert a vehicle from left hand steer to right hand steer if it was never designed that way from the start. However, if designers are starting with a clean sheet they can make accommodations at fairly low cost. We don’t have a list of RHS vehicles from US automakers.

BTW, we use the term right hand steer, not right hand drive. There is front wheel drive, and rear wheel drive, and all wheel drive, but there really isn’t any vehicle with right hand drive.

McElroy
10-8-2014

Hello John,

Just a word regarding your gee whiz reportage of Challenger’s “wicked” engine.

It seems rather derisive, in a world where the World Energy Council has been working since 1926 to: “promote research into the means of supplying and using energy having, short and long term, the greatest social benefit and the least harmful impact on the natural environment“ to then come out bragging about the Hellcat.

The ability of an automobile to turn 30000 litres of air into exhaust gases is nothing to revel in. “Sucking all the air out of an office” must seem rather mystifying to residents of Beijing or Shanghai as they struggle to breathe during pollution emergencies. Boasting about excessive engine output, used for no discernible reason, belongs in a world before climate change, before geopolitical struggles to maintain oil supplies, before wholesale environmental destruction like the oil sands projects. Readers would be well served to reading more about automotive advancements for the real world.

Always look forward to your show and insights; thanks,

Geert Weber
Geert,

If this was a high volume car sold to hundreds of thousands of customers I would agree with you. But it’s not. It’s a very, very low-volume car that will primarily be driven on the track. It will also emit far less emissions than any of the historic cars that collectors own, and probably less than the brand-new exotics from Ferrari, Lamborghini, et all. In its own way, it is a technological masterpiece.

Don’t worry, we’re not hung up on only reporting about cars like the Hellcat. We are constantly reporting on new technologies that make mass-production vehicles lighter, cleaner, and safer. But every now and then we like to have a little fun.

Best,
John McElroy
10-8-2014

In the TLX seat time review on YouTube at the end the guy said that Acura is going to show a new form language, does this mean they're finally getting rid of that ugly grill and add exhaust tips back to their cars? What do you guys think?

Fadi
We think they will come up on some sort of variation of that grille that looks a lot better. And we hadn’t thought about the exhaust tips, nice catch! We’ll just have to wait and see what Acura comes out with.

McElroy
10-8-2014

Next time you interview somebody from General Motors could you ask who the brain surgeon was that decided it was okay to make the backup lights come on when somebody is entering the car or otherwise hits their key fobs? Them damn things are for backing up purposes only to indicate to others that it is backing up. Never in our culture did we ever plan on having those to be for the same purpose as a courtesy light.

Driving through a parking lot I spilled my coffee as I slammed on my brakes thinking somebody was about to pull out in front of me. Many other situations such as that have occurred. And the funny thing is they don't even provide good lighting! They are simply intended to be an indicator for passersby to know what the driver is doing.

Thanks,
Toyota Thomas
10-8-2014

Hello,

I just got some anti Right to Work literature from my Teamster local in Cleveland, OH. The question I have for you is how has the Right to Work legislation affected Michigan, particularly wages and unemployment levels. I think Ohio and Michigan have a lot of similarities, I know you deal more with the UAW but Teamsters will benefit as well if there is more freight to move.

Thanks,
Robert McKee
Right to work is too new in Michigan to measure its impact. However, it seems that white collar union workers (teachers, ASFME) are not as loyal to their unions as blue collar workers are. It's unlikely it will have much of an impact on the UAW in Michigan.

John McElroy
10-8-2014

What is this strange movement towards misshapen rear windows? There must be some kind of design directive that I cannot understand which mandates odd lower side window profiles in an attempt to create some kind of visual excitement. I give you four examples – Lincoln MKT, Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Honda Odyssey and BMW i3. The window treatment is especially egregious on the Genesis, which is basically a good looking sporty coupe. I am very pleased that they didn’t mess up the new F-Type Jag with this kind of nonsense!

Regards,
Steve Read
9-18-2014

John,

I've got two questions for you. Don't spend a lot of time on them, because they are silly.

1. Why the hell is a camshaft called a camshaft? I've actually spent quite a bit of effort over the years trying to figure out where the word itself comes from. Is it possible it comes from camel shaft, meaning a shaft with humps? Or is it a corruption of commencement shaft? No clue.

2. When the hell did auto journos become so enamored of addressing themselves in the plural? "We find the seats to be uncomfortable on our butts". "This is a car that our mothers would like". Seems to me this quirk started less than 10 years ago, but I could be wrong. So far as I can tell, no other writers/testers/journalists/authors/textbooks/etc use this convention. Just wondering.

Kip Amore
The word "cam" goes back to 16th century Dutch. The "we" and, "our" don't go back that far, but they've been used a long time. That usage tends to downplay the writers personal opinion.

John McElroy
9-18-2014

Hello Mr. McElroy,

I enjoy Autoline This Week every Sunday on Detroit’s local PBS station, Channel 56. I especially found this past week’s episode about 3D printing to be interesting. I work in the mental health field, but my specialty is clinical informatics. I deal with computer-clinician interaction, and the use of collected medical data to improve the quality of healthcare, while (hopefully) decreasing costs.

A couple of articles that I thought you would find interesting deal with the production of prosthetic eyes using 3D printers and making casts to immobilize bone fractures using 3D printers. The prosthetic eyes can be “mass” produced (150/hour, rather than singly) at a fraction of the cost ($163 vs. $4,000+), and take hours, not weeks to complete. The cast is custom made to fit the specifics of the patient’s anatomy. It is an open structure, which is lighter and cooler to wear. Unlike plaster casts, it is fully waterproof and can be recycled.

Thank you for a great show. I look forward to each Sunday.

Regards,
Barry
Barry,

Thanks so much for sending this along. It's fascinating. I had no idea 3D printing was being used this way.

John McElroy
9-18-2014

Hi John, my name is Fran Donahue and I am a supervisor at Ford in engine development. I really enjoyed the title blog but either I don’t understand how to add comments to the comment string or I was too late, so I am sending this email to you!

I am very interested in the employment interests of young people, both as a father of early twenties children, and as an employer looking for engineering talent. Ford is going through a significant hiring action now. It is exciting to see twenty-somethings in the workforce among us fifty-somethings! As I interview candidates I am finding there are many talented and ambitious engineers interested in coming to work in our engine development business. I think this interest reflects that the auto business is driving so much technology into the vehicles to achieve the ambitious fuel economy requirements, balanced against a buying public that largely still wants power “on demand”. It is a cool technical and marketing problem set.

The engineers we are interviewing have relevant experiences through Co-ops, internships, Formula SAE, classwork, etc., and they are well-read about the goings-ons in the auto business in WardsAuto, Car and Driver, Autoweek, etc. Those we have hired into engine development in the past few years have been staying – very low turnover. I think they see opportunity, both in the technical challenges I noted above, but also in leadership opportunities as the current engineering workforce begins retiring in droves. So my sense is young people are not shunning the auto industry – enough are taking a look and liking the opportunity!

I agree with you that the advertising is not selling the dream anymore, but some clever young people are entering our business with lots of opportunity to make a difference starting the day they show up.

Thanks for taking the time to read this.

Fran
Fran,

That’s great to see that you’re getting young people coming into Ford who are excited and motivated to be there. Now we need to have that happening at all levels and all disciplines.

Best,
John McElroy
9-18-2014

Hey John,

FYI, as my family comes from the area (Chieti) that Sergio also comes from, I kinda cringe when I hear US journalists pronounce Sergio Marchionne's name perhaps incorrectly. To my understanding it is not pronounced "mar-she-own" as I often hear.

According to proper annunciation, his name should be pronounced as follows. Sergio Marchionne or (pronounced “Mar-key-OWN-ee”). My own feeble research found several articles confirming my suspicions.

So, just a heads up. Take it for what you will.

Cheers,
Lamberto Smigliani, RA
Lamberto,

I used to pronounce his name Mar-key-own-nee, until I personally asked Sergio how he pronounces his last name. “Mar-she-own” he told me. And so ever since I’ve pronounced it the way he does.

Best,
John McElroy
9-18-2014

I was curious about the "downmarket" luxury Audi A3 having better bones than the VW Jetta which looks to be the same car, shape, space, etc.

I believe the A3 is made in Hungary and the Jetta in Mexico. My guess is that the better bones may come in the suspension, brake components and grade of interior, but otherwise, it looks very similar.

rwork
9-18-2014

John,

Would you put some links of video clips or previous programs of your interviews of Jim Harbour?

I have wondered who your mentor was in the automotive business.

Now I know.

Don Bronn
Owensboro, KY
Don,

If you type in “Jim Harbour” to the search bar on the Autoline website it will take you to links of all the shows that we did with him.
9-18-2014

John,

Just an observation about the autonomous car promises we've been bombarded with over the past few years. Like most people, I simply cannot wrap my head around the idea of getting in a car with no steering wheel, telling it where to go, and then having a panic attack while the thing goes there while I have no control. Nightmare.

I'm not sure why I didn't think of it before, but OF COURSE it won't work that way. The only way for the public to accept autonomous cars is if the switchover to them is so gradual that nobody notices. You still need to sit behind the wheel and drive as you normally do, but the car won't LET YOU do anything stupid or fatal. It won't LET YOU rear end the guy in front of you, or back over a kid on a tricycle, or wander into oncoming traffic. After 10 or 20 years of driving like that, perhaps humans will be acclimated and willing to relinquish full control to the car.

But for all the nay-sayers who think that autonomous will be "the end of driving"...get real. It will take multiple decades of zero fatality, flawless operation autonomous driving before they ever get rid of the steering wheel, much less the brake pedal.

Kip Amore
Kip,

You’re absolutely right, autonomy is going to come in steps. There are plenty of legal and legislative issues that have to worked out, so it won’t be overnight. However, we believe it will happen sooner than most people think. We also believe that people with physical handicaps and the elderly who don’t want to give up their cars will prove to be eager buyers once the safety of the technology is proven.

McElroy
Alan,

Thanks so much for sending us this link. Somehow it had escaped our notice. As you know, we here at Autoline are big fans of Bob Hall, and have treasured the times when he’s been on our shows. The fact that he’s going to work for Peter Horbury at Geely is definitely intriguing.

McElroy
9-18-2014

Hi John,

Love the show. I've been watching/listening for years. I'm an Australian working and living in China. I got to drive a Tesla here last week and even though I can't afford one I thought the Tesla was fantastic. I normally ride a 250cc motorcycle to work because I could get a numberplate for that much easier as a foreigner.

Reason for email : You said the other day that Sweden was the last country you thought that changed which of the road they drive. Samoa (in the Pacific) did it in 2009 because they wanted to buy grey imports from Japan which are a cheap alternative for them. Funnily, they banned alcohol leading up to and for a few days after the switch so everyone was focused !! lol

Cheers,
Tony Prior
Tony,

Great to hear from an Aussie in China! And thanks for the correction about Samoa. We did not know that.

Best,
John McElroy
9-18-2014

John,

I am reading more and more about the fuel efficient engines used in Europe. VW has a blue motion engine giving 78 MPG! This engine is not ‘allowed’ in North America due to various reasons; More fuel efficient engines means less fuel tax and oil companies losing revenues? And what ever happened to VW’s XL1 a 300 MPG vehicle? Sounds like a major conspiracy to keep everyone using gas guzzling vehicles and reap high profits? Sounds like this could be a reason EV’s are not selling, and might never do well?

Wh4653
Wh4653,

The VW engine you mention does not meet U.S. emission standards, that’s why it’s not allowed in the U.S. Also, the 78 mpg rating is misleading. Europe has the easiest tests in the world and all the engines over there pass with sky-high ratings. And while the VW XL1 is headed for the showrooms, you better start saving your pennies. The expected price tag will be about $170,000.
9-18-2014

Hey guys how come no comment on Subaru's continued 25+% growth in your discussion on Thursday evening?

I keep wondering where those customers are coming from, there can't be that many Saab converts! :)

Wine Geek
Wine Geek,

We’ve been talking a lot about Subaru’s amazing success all year long and will get back to it at some point. And you’re right, it’s coming from a lot more than Saab converts.
9-4-2014

John,

Great show as always today!

I’m intrigued by a couple of subjects in your report related to ad dollars spent and whether car companies consider racing as marketing dollars. Can you run the numbers that would combine both figures for at least GM, Ford, and FCA (at least Dodge, Chrysler, and Jeep) and re-compare? Since Dodge pulled out of NASCAR, and other racing programs within the FCA group have been whittled down, my guess is that if you added racing program dollars spent to ads purchased, FCA (again Dodge, Chrysler, and Jeep) would be at the bottom of the list rather than leading it.

I’m purposely not including Ferrari in this mix because I believe it’s a different animal altogether.

Just thought it would be interesting to see the ranking with this perspective.

Thanks,

Mark B.
Waukesha, WI
Mark,

I sure wish we could run those numbers for you, but car companies treat their racing budgets as top secret information. We don’t have access to that!

McElroy
9-4-2014

John,

Changing which side of the road you drive on. Actually it was Samoa in 2009 who was the last to change which side they drive on, and they changed from right to left. This was to bring them in line with other SE Asian countries, Australia, New Zealand and Japan, so as to make it easier to import used cars.

Eric/Rumblestrip
9-4-2014

John,

I have heard you and your great team talk about the democratization of luxury and technology. Seems the auto brands stuff the newest, neatest stuff into what ever vehicle is coming through the development process when the new tech hits. Gone are the days when you had to buy 'up market' vehicles to the goodies. Not sure that is great strategically for mid to upper tier brands.

Listening to Larry Nitz the other night talk about the new Volt, I wonder if Chevy is going to get the next generation GM range extended hybrid before the ELR from Cadillac gets it. I think that would be a shame.

BTW - Larry seems like a great guy, highly decorated/recognized, super smart or as Peter D said - A True Believer!

Peter Smith
Lugano, CH
9-4-2014

Just a note I sent to the recall site, my final say in the matter...

Dear Ms. Barra/GM,

I have had the recall repair to my Cobalt completed. I found it rather curious though, I was offered $500.00 additional trade in allowance if I traded in my car. It took 3 months for the repair while my car sat at the local dealer’s lot. The rental car that you issued through Enterprise (and thank you for doing that) was listed at $35/day. That would be about $3,000. I would assume you negotiated a better deal than that but none the less, a substantial amount of money. Had you offered $2,000 towards a trade in, I would have gladly done so. But $500 is really almost irrelevant, that much is easily lost in the negotiations of a new car. As such with a $2,000 allowance I would have been a happy customer and GM would have decidedly my first choice for my next car. I do not fault your actions and am content with the outcome but I believe you missed an opportunity to save yourself a little money and to enhance your position and gain customer loyalty.

Sincerely,
Larry Skellion
9-4-2014

John, I heard your report on car loans based on info from Equifax. It seems the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's website has a much less rosy picture. They claim in the 2nd. quarter of 2014 15.1% of US auto loans were delinquent for more than 30 days. A 44% increase over the 1st. quarter of 2012! Not the direction you want to see delinquencies heading. There always seems to be 2 sides to the story.

Will Beck
9-4-2014

Although everyone disdains the transparent badge engineering that marked the US manufacturers in years gone by, I am sort of surprised when I hear praise heaped on the VW Group for how well they manage the complexity of all their brands.

Living in Europe I see a lot of SEAT and Skoda's that bear an uncomfortable resemblance to Audi models of the last few years. This is especially true of lighting assemblies fore and aft. Given VW Group's extensive use of the 1.8, 2.0 and TDI engines and trans, I think they play a much more offensive game of badge engineering than the US brands do today. We may not see this in the USA but I think VW Group is teetering on brand identity problems. This seems especially true give VW's expansion of 4Motion offerings and Audi's embrace of diesel models and the intro of the MBQQ platform - look out VW, this path doesn't wear well.

Peter Smith
Excellent observation and let’s hope VW is willing to listen.

McElroy
9-4-2014

There is a lot of discussion on Autoline about transmissions and the number of gears. ie. 6, 8, 9 etc. There are already continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) out there. Why wouldn't they be the most efficient?

HoboBob
HoboBob,

CVT’s can deliver better fuel economy than traditional gear transmissions when driven lightly. But many drivers don’t like the feel of a CVT. Not even the CVTs that are calibrated to shift more like traditional transmissions. And that’s especially true of enthusiast drivers. Also, earlier versions of CVTs had a lot of problems and some automakers have been scared off by the warranty costs. Those issues seem to have been resolved, but CVTs still have something of an image problem to overcome.

McElroy
9-4-2014

Hi John,

I see that you are going to have as a guest on Autoline This Week on Oct 2, A. J. Baime, the author of Arsenal of Democracy.

I have recently finished reading the book and highly recommend it to any WWII or auto enthusiast. Any person with an interest in the Ford Family (which I am) will probably learn some "inside" of the family which they never knew.

The book is a great tribute to Detroit, the people of Detroit and the role Detroit played in supporting America and her Allies in the late 30's and early 40's. The differences in political beliefs, union/non-union leanings and race were all were overcome to support one mission (defeating Adolf Hitler).

Your October 2nd show should be of interest to most all of your viewers and even those who aren't.

I believe you have chosen a wonderful guest and am looking forward to the show.

Dave Forslund
Norwalk, CT
Dave,

Thanks for the great feedback. This is definitely a show that any WWII or auto enthusiast will appreciate.

McElroy
9-4-2014

Hi John,

I was wondering about the ability for autonomous vehicles to avoid unexpected events like potholes or giant truck tire carcasses. I know of several level crossings that you wouldn’t want to hit at full speed. Perhaps that kind of “smart” avoidance won’t be built-in until a future generation of this technology?

Regards,
Steve Read
Autonomous cars should be able to deal with potholes and tire carcasses. With connected car technology, the second car on the scene would certainly miss them.

McElroy
9-3-2014

WHY do I have to have black interior if I want a Ford truck? I would love a Raptor but the interior only comes in "bake you until you are well done" black! A truck that was designed as a desert racer should never be black inside. It is impossible to keep clean and hotter than an oven!

Rick
Since the Raptor is a very low volume vehicle, Ford clearly wanted to keep the complexity to a minimum, hence “any interior color you want so long as it’s black.” Of course, you can always customize it yourself. May we suggest white shag carpeting with cashmere egg-shell seats?

McElroy
9-3-2014

The Impala, LaCrosse, and the XTS are all on the same platform. Impala vehicles start at about $22 K, LaCrosse vehicles start at about $33 K, and XTS vehicles start at about $44 K. My Dad has an 08 LaCrosse with over 100,000 miles on it. He's hoping to drive at least a few more years, but then he will have to get another vehicle. He could save money and go with the Impala, he could stay with another LaCrosse, or he could splurge for an XTS. My question to you guys is: are the cars on this platform worth the price premiums or are you just paying for the nameplate?

Wes
Great question. It’s all about what any buyer wants. If you’re OK with a car you’ll see all over the place, go with the Chevy. If you want a more premium image, go with the Buick. If you want exclusivity then go with Cadillac. Obviously there are content differences, but the big difference is with the number of these cars that each brand sells.

McElroy
9-3-2014

Geez John! I thought you were a 'Free Market' guy. We don't need to have another job to require a license. More than anything else, licensing is a sop to those who would set the requirements (e.g.> schools & training centers) and trade associations who like to restrict membership so as to push up wages and fees. Come on John! You ought to know better!

Vincent A. Joy
I still am a free market guy. But I sure would like to know that the guy working on my brakes knows what he’s doing. And if dealerships and repair shops require a mechanic certification, so should the quick-lube type shops.

McElroy
9-3-2014

About me, been an avid watcher of the show for about 2-years. Self described biggest automotive junky under 30 in the world. College graduate from Kelley School at Indiana Univ, sorry not a U Mich guy but have respect for State and Michigan, 3 years bulge bracket banking experience (i.e. BofA, JPM, Credit Suisse).

In regards to R&D discrepancies, here are a few points.

YoY R&D investment can fluctuate significantly in relation to FCF, considering Toyotas hick-ups. Also drivetrain specific hybrid tech has somewhat hit the wall /fork in the road on what's next, while diesel tech is alive and thriving from a global platform think the new BMW M50D.

In general, historically, German companies have R&D budgets built in more solidly to the core business model. Think back, given no holds bar Germans will R&D spend their way into bankruptcy/destruction. It's part of the ideology.

Redundant but Toyota's hybrid market share ROI doesn't shake a stick at VWs diesel Market Share. The informed consumer is a more valuable customer both theoretically and from a YoY liquidity perspective to bottom line revenue. Don't have exact numbers but peg diesel platform for MK4 Golf Jetta to first 2nd gen Prius so about 2002-2014 and isolate return customers and value add to company and VW will Blow toyota out of the water.

I'm just rambling on the fly but I can more fully flesh out numbers. If you have a ballpark idea you should be able to follow my thought process. Feel free to correct me on missteps though, I'm a young enthusiast and always yearning to learn more.

Also I talk about diesel a lot but I'm not one of those diehard diesel guys, never owned one nor looking to buy one in the near future. I think it's a knee jerk reaction though to think of diesel as low tech but in reality we know it's the exact opposite.

Thanks and look forward to seeing more episodes.

Ryan
9-3-2014

Good afternoon:

I am a regular viewer and enjoyed today’s show on the Mexican auto industry and in particular John Martin of Nissan. While he did sound a bit like a Nissan Commercial at times, his grasp of facts and his presentation was superb.

The show gave me a number of excellent perspectives, especially Free Trade Agreements and the ratio thereof in the United States compared to Mexico. With the influx of new auto factories to Mexico, the American Government should pause to reflect on whether only having half of the agreements that Mexico, means that domestic protectionism should be challenged on some fronts.

As a private pension manager for many years, this type of information only enhances what our company can do for our clients and I thank your show for it.

Enjoy the series;

Greg Wyatt,
Vancouver, BC
Greg,

Thanks for the feedback, it’s very interesting to know your background and the value you see in the show.

We too were very impressed with John Martin from Nissan.

McElroy
9-3-2014

Mr. McElroy,

I really enjoy the show. Thank you.

On the Aug 22 show, on the piece about the history of the HMMWV, you mentioned that General Dynamics won the original contract.

I thought it was AM General, though.

GD did recently form a joint venture for a related vehicle project, but it was AM General that won the bid several decades ago.

Sincerely,
Thomas Scott
9-3-2014

Hello John, I enjoy watching your show every Sunday. Your most recent show with guests Susan, François & Sharon prompted me to weigh in on their comments. I find it interesting that although as you said, the best selling colors are black, white & silver, so many ads in magazines & on television showcase new cars in red (usually their optional metallic burgundy reds.)

The other thing that I find interesting is when you look back at the beautiful cars from 1955 to the 1970's, the manufacturers finished their cars in beautiful colors inside & out. They had new colors almost every year & they had no computers or technology that is available today yet they say it takes approx. 4 yrs. to introduce a new color today ---- Are we making progress??? I don't know.

Just had to get that off my chest!

Thanks,

Bruce Emmons,
Brockville Ont.
8-14-2014

This is just to congratulate Barbara on her performance this week. I think she did an excellent job filling in for John.

I can admit I like having different presenters every so often, because it’s refreshing to hear different styles of reporting, yet I wouldn't mind seeing Barbara more often.

Bets regards,
Genaro Islas
8-14-2014

John,

With better fuel economy than petrol engines, especially at constant speeds, why aren't auto makers using diesel instead of gas to power engines used to charge batteries (like the Chevy Volt)?

Regards,

Peter Parsons
Shanghai, China
Don’t be surprised if we see diesel range extenders sometime in the future. But diesel engines are more expensive to manufacture. And PHEV’s are already pretty expensive to make. So that’s why you’re seeing gasoline engines in those cars.

McElroy
8-14-2014

John, I'm commenting on Barbara Banyai filling in for you last week. If she keeps coming in some of us may not miss you! Ok, I'm joking! I will say in the many years I've watched your show I've always enjoyed watching and listening to someone who is well spoken and clearly conveys their message. I watch the show because I'm interested in the automotive news. I remember over the years many people, both men and women, who I thought were wonderful, because they were well spoken, intelligent and clearly conveyed their message. Clearly people who were in their positions because they earned it.

Ms. Banyai may or may not be in the automotive industry, but she clearly conveyed your messages last week. I truly enjoyed watching her and I'm going to guess this is not her first time in front of a crowd....or camera. She did a great job, and if you have to leave us, please consider calling her in to fill in.

I hope you and Gary had a great time in the Cherry capital, I'm always watching!

Sincerely,

Amado Arceo
Saginaw, MI
8-14-2014

I wanted to let you folks know that Ms. Banyai was actually a refreshing addition to the Autoline Daily production. I approve of her continuation. As much as I like the "guys talking shop" aspect of industry news, it was nice to see a woman in the broadcast seat.

Tejash Vishalpura
8-14-2014

Hi John,

Quick thing regarding today’s story on China losing its rare-earth appeal, I am advised the following:

Li-ion batteries do not use/need rare earth metals. Rare-earth metals, specifically Neodymium-based magnets, are used in electric machines such as hybrid and electric vehicle drive motors, and generators.

Thanks and best regards,
Dick
8-14-2014

JMac,

You'll be delighted to know that you can start to use up all those vacation days you've banked. Barb Banyai was delightful. Her voice, tone & delivery was very professional & pleasant to listen to, and not to be sexist, easy on the eyes. I'd easily say she was a welcome replacement host.

But John, don't pack those bags too often because your enthusiasm, insight & knowledge are second to none. After all, Autoline is John McElroy, and there really is no true "replacement.”

Warm regards,

Speedracer2007
Tony G.
8-14-2014

Just wanted you to know I thoroughly enjoyed Barbara this week and feel she did a splendid job and hope she returns as needed. If I were not married I would propose to her!

Hugh
8-14-2014

Just a comment. I never heard or saw Barbara do the show before. I must say, she is a good choice. She does a better job than anyone else on the show (besides John) - no slights intended. She doesn’t look uncomfortable or make me feel awkward for her (like all the other guest hosts), plus she just happens to be very pretty. Anyway, I watch AD either way, just thought I'd comment on a guest host I think you should have on more often.

I have a feeling I’m not the only one giving positive feedback on her.

Thanks,
Eric Staudt
8-14-2014

Barbara is a sweetie and did a great job hosting for John in his absence this past week, how can anyone NOT like Barbara, I surely did enjoy her.

Tom C,
Clearwater, FL
8-14-2014

Just a quick note to say I thought Dr. Zhao was fascinating. The surface has been scratched. I would like to see more in-depth discussion with him alone or a part of a panel. His insights into China cannot be trumpeted ENOUGH to us USA auto folks. They will prove to be invaluable, I think.

James
We agree. Dr. Zhao’s comments, and the way he words them, have earned him the nickname of “The Bob Lutz of China.”

McElroy
8-14-2014

John,

I’d be interested in hearing your opinion of some of the major issues in the automotive world from a different point of view.

Specifically;

1. Fuel economy regulations. If car companies made NO further improvement in fuel economy beyond what they have already announced, what would they be reduced to? (For example, would Ford be reduced to selling Fiesta, Focus, and Fusion Hybrid on the car side and matching trucks on the truck side – EcoSport, Escape and Explorer Hybrid based on the Fusion) If they were reduced to those models, how would their sales volume in the US compare to now. (50%? 90%?). If a Fusion Hybrid based Explorer was made into a pickup truck, how would it compare to the current and new aluminum F-150? I’m sure the story would vary wildly from car company to car company.

2. Autonomous vehicles. If autonomous vehicles were suddenly perfected, how many ‘professional drivers’ would be out of work. (I.e. how many taxi, bus, transport truck, delivery truck, FedEx etc drivers are there in the US? What percent of the employed population is that?

Thanks,
Kevin Anderson
We would guesstimate that if Ford made no further CAFE improvements, it would essentially have to stop selling all its trucks, SUVs, and vans by 2016.That would eliminate over half of its sales.

There are 3.5 million commercial vehicle drivers in the U.S. which is about 1.2% of the U.S. employed population.

McElroy
8-14-2014

Hi John,

I worked late and missed the live broadcast; just watched the U-stream. Had I been in the live circle, my question to Mr. O’Leary would have been: ‘will Ford offer a paint-delete (option) on the new F-150?’ What’s the chance?

Let me know if you find anything.

BTW- good discussion between yourself, Gary and Lindsay for the duration.

Thanks,

Neil
Varick, NY
Neil, we would say the chances are slim to none that Ford would offer a paint-delete option. The only brand we’re aware of that offered a paint-delete option was Scion with the xB, and Toyota no longer does that.

McElroy
8-14-2014

John McElroy,

On this evenings show Lindsay Brooke of SAE mentioned that the belt alternator starter (BAS) was becoming common technology on all vehicles. My question is what happened to the flywheel alternator starter (FAS). GM had one and so did Bosch. GM mentioned the FAS as new technology for 2015 in their bankruptcy filing.

Ray Aurand
The FAS systems are still out there, but require more modifications to a powertrain than simply bolting on a beefier alternator. OEMs looking for a low cost solution are using the BAS.

McElroy
8-14-2014

John,

While giving the Honda Q1 earnings report you included Bikes! Has the Honda earnings always included bikes? And lawnmowers? And Jets? And outboard engines? And small engines for weedwackers? Seems to me it should be auto related only, and not include 35cc engines for T-Post drivers.

Will Beck
Well, the BMW financial numbers include motorcycles. So do the VW numbers, now that they own Ducati. The Toyota numbers include the dinky 660 cc kei cars made by Daihatsu. And all automakers include earnings from their financial subsidiaries. We could go on and on. The point is, unless you look at the financial health of the entire company, you won’t get an idea of how healthy it really is.

McElroy
8-14-2014

Hello,

Buying a Car in 2014. I did not have a chance to watch the whole show yet. But based on the comments on the initial minutes regarding 'more selling' happening in the old days, I'd like to point out that these days most salespersons DO NOT know very much about the cars they are selling. They make stuff up, like performance, weight, etc. I don't know if it is because I am an enthusiast, but whenever I go to a dealer to test drive a car, or even call before I drive there to find out about certain options with some of the cars on their lot as shown on the website, I know more about the cars they are selling than they do. So I can't consider them 'true' car sales persons that know their products.

Vittorio from L.A.
8-14-2014

Greetings,

Regarding AD# 1422, I am curious with the Costco statement “We work with fleet only, so that they’re not the next walk-in into the showroom”. Does this mean buyers who go through Costco can purchase cars at fleet prices? Is that what’s contributing to the higher closing ratio?

Mike from Mississauga
Mike,

That’s exactly right. Costco buys cars in bulk and gets discounted fleet prices, which it then offers to its members.

McElroy

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