AD #2615 – Volvo & Uber Reveal Production AV, Tesla Delays Semi-Truck, FCA Sued Over Wrangler “Death Wobble”

June 13th, 2019 at 11:56am

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Listen to “AD #2615 – Volvo and Uber Reveal Production AV, Tesla Delays Semi-Truck, FCA Sued Over Wrangler “Death Wobble”” on Spreaker.

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Runtime: 6:13

0:07 China Sales Continue to Tumble
0:48 David Woodhouse Joins Nissan
1:09 Tesla Delays Semi-Truck
2:46 Volvo & Uber Show Off Production Ready AV
3:19 Hyundai Partners with Aurora
3:52 Ford Testing AVs In Detroit
4:38 FCA Sued Over Jeep Wrangler “Death Wobble”

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14 Comments to “AD #2615 – Volvo & Uber Reveal Production AV, Tesla Delays Semi-Truck, FCA Sued Over Wrangler “Death Wobble””

  1. Albemarle Says:

    I wonder if David Woodhouse’s move to Nissan at this time is a step forward in his career. So much energy will be spent over the next year getting the alliance working again.
    Not to say that Nissan doesn’t need him. They must have just run the Rogue through a hot wash & dry cycle to shrink it and then market it as a Qashqai or Rogue Sport. Zero originality there.

  2. Lambo2015 Says:

    I actually had a class A motorhome built on the Ford F53 Chassis which uses the solid front axle. I once had it go into a death wobble after it had been sitting a while and the LH front brake caliper was stuck. It is quite an experience when it happens and has rightfully been given the name death wobble.

  3. MJB Says:

    Yep, my wife and I actually came across one of Ford’s Fusion AV’s while Downtown last week. And when I say “came across”, I mean literally we were clearing a crosswalk in front of one at Campus Martius.

  4. JWH Says:

    #2 – While I believe the tendency for the wobble is greater on solid front axle, I don’t believe it is characteristic on all solid front axle vehicles. Last time I experienced this was on our 1965 International crew cab pickup which would frequently wobble after hitting a bump. Later on we had 1979 CJ7 (with large 12.00 x 15 tires) & a 1984 Cherokee XJ that never demonstrated the condition.

  5. Kit Gerhart Says:

    What’s going on with the Jeep wobble? Do they need a steering damper, or is there an oscillation going on in the suspension itself?

  6. Marshy Says:

    My JK experienced this at 45K. New tires replacing stock fixed it. Shook the front so hard it threw power steering fluid out of the reservoir. Up and down 4-6” at the front.

    One dealer tried to fix with the upgraded stabilizer the second changed the tires (which had plenty of tread).

  7. merv Says:

    I experienced the “death wobble” on a bicycle flying down a steep hill as a child. I got pitched off and scraped up before i knew what had happened.

  8. ChuckGrenci Says:

    Steering wobble can be experienced on motorcycles too. One of the remedial actions is to replace the triple tree bearing with roller bearings (from the mostly used ball bearing); perhaps a more robust ball joint (or other suspension pieces need to be studied) to rectify this situation. Could this be another time where correction is a little more expensive than the manufacturer wishes to spend when the problem isn’t universal. You know the expression: penny wise, dollar foolish; this one may come back and bite FCA in the butt.

  9. Kit Gerhart Says:

    8 I had a very scary wobble with a Yamaha RD400 years ago, and I consider myself very lucky that I didn’t crash. The “air head” BMWs I’ve had all had steering dampers to help prevent such things. The BMWs also had roller steering head bearings.

  10. Lambo2015 Says:

    8 Ahe yes I have experienced it on a motorcycle as well. Back when I had a sports bike GSXR. I was passing another vehicle got on it a little too much front wheel came off the ground slightly. When I completed my pass and was leaning to get back in the right lane front wheel came down but was not parallel with the direction of the bike. Death wobble started at about 75mph. First reaction is to brake which will make it worse so I just twisted on the throttle pulled the front wheel off the ground again and set it down strait. Then pulled over to catch my breath. Not a experience I ever want to have again.

  11. Kit Gerhart Says:

    I was just accelerating hard with the front end light, going straight, when I had my wobble. I had low, narrow bars on the bike, which probably contributed.

  12. joe Says:

    If you believe Elon Musk, he will tell you more stories.

  13. Bobby T Says:

    My 1971 F100 with twin I-beam would also get the death wobble occasionally, especially after it had about 50K miles on it. Slowing down would stop it.

  14. MERKUR DRIVER Says:

    If it is inherent in a steerable beam axle front as FCA claims, then they need to state as such in the owners manual. They also need to give a recommended maximum travel speed and mitigation strategy if the wobble occurs. The lack of the statement means that it is not something the customer is expected to experience.

    They will lose this argument as the customer can simply state that they were not informed by FCA that steerable beam axles will produce a “death wobble”. Had they known this at the time of purchase, they may not have purchased the vehicle. Thusly, I would argue that FCA would be buying my vehicle back since there was an undisclosed design flaw. These are consumers, not engineers.

    Since most FCA engineers live around the Detroit area, there is no shortage of large bumps on the highway systems around them. They would have experienced this situation during development. Since most executives get to evaluate the first non-saleable pilot vehicles, they would have experienced this situation. It would be hard for FCA to claim otherwise while also claiming that it is inherent in the steerable beam axle design. They knew about it and released the vehicle with a known issue that was not disclosed to the consumer. Sorry about your luck FCA, but you will lose this argument.